(smooth takeoff in 1st) Driving Manual in a 2014 Civic Si - Page 2
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Thread: (smooth takeoff in 1st) Driving Manual in a 2014 Civic Si

  1. #11
    Super Mod's Pet Squidward's Avatar
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    The amount of throttle you'll use depends on the incline of the road, usually you'll be using ~1400 rpm give or take a few hundred. Like others have said getting the right throttle / clutch position takes practice to be converted to muscle memory. If the car is lugging as you start off then you need to give more throttle. Eventually you'll be able to have your left foot move seamlessly to the engagement point and your right foot will add the right amount of throttle, it just takes practice to feel those positions out. Also if you're worried about too much friction when you're setting off, don't start in 2nd. The decrease in torque from using a smaller cog means you have to slip the clutch longer and with more throttle to not stall, use first like how the car was made to be driven.
    2013 DBP Si Coupe

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  3. #12
    Nooblets
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    Stop starting off in second for the time being. That will actually wear out your clutch faster as you have to ride it longer and apply more throttle.

    You have to practice it right in order to become consistently good. Erase your bad muscle memory (which is causing your problem) by fixing the bad habit you have (not giving enough gas on take off) and then practice doing it right over and over again. Typically, on a flat road with a stock 9th gen, 1100-1500 RPM should be just about right. Adjust accordingly for incline, passengers, and general preference, but you get the point.
    qingcong likes this.

  4. #13
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    Lots of great responses here. I just want to echo the tip about going to an empty parking lot and practice without any throttle. Finding the engagement point and getting that into your muscle memory is the trick. Every car is different so it just takes time. Driving my father-in-laws MX-5 is very difficult for me because the clutch engagement is almost immediately off of the floor, whereas in my Si it is about halfway back. I actually stalled the MX-5 once the last time I drove it and I haven't stalled a car in many years prior to that. My 6-speed MINI was definitely easier to drive smoothly compared to my Si. Time and patience.

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  6. #14
    Super Mod's Pet Squidward's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by teamrubixcube View Post
    Lots of great responses here. I just want to echo the tip about going to an empty parking lot and practice without any throttle. Finding the engagement point and getting that into your muscle memory is the trick. Every car is different so it just takes time. Driving my father-in-laws MX-5 is very difficult for me because the clutch engagement is almost immediately off of the floor, whereas in my Si it is about halfway back. I actually stalled the MX-5 once the last time I drove it and I haven't stalled a car in many years prior to that. My 6-speed MINI was definitely easier to drive smoothly compared to my Si. Time and patience.
    Exactly, it's all about muscle memory, I've had a similar experience with my dads cayman. The clutch is the exact opposite of the Si's clutch, it has a long travel and a heavy weight, the clutch engages gradually over the full throw rather than in a quick bite half way up the pedal travel like on the Si. It's almost impossible to stall that car, but smooth, aggressive 1-2 shifts were tough coming from my Si.
    2013 DBP Si Coupe

  7. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squidward View Post
    Exactly, it's all about muscle memory, I've had a similar experience with my dads cayman. The clutch is the exact opposite of the Si's clutch, it has a long travel and a heavy weight, the clutch engages gradually over the full throw rather than in a quick bite half way up the pedal travel like on the Si. It's almost impossible to stall that car, but smooth, aggressive 1-2 shifts were tough coming from my Si.
    That reminds me of my father's ride a bit; he has 1967 Mustang GT with the 4-speed manual. Shifting into first smoothly with that clutch is nearly impossible, and once I have it down after a drive it throws off my Si shifts when I hop back into my car.

    I'm jealous of your Cayman adventures. I would love to have a Cayman or Boxster. I think one of my old buddies is planning on buying a relatively new Porsche this spring so I'll have to make the hour drive to visit (his past cars have been bugeye Sti, EVO X, C6 Vette, and most currently a comfortable Benz of sorts). I guess that's the difference between a Psychologist vs. a Teacher's salary.
    Last edited by teamrubixcube; 02-17-2017 at 01:13 PM.

  8. #16
    Nooblets
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    I've owned 5 cars and all were manual. my '14 Si is the least forgiving. Besides all the things mentioned on the posts, I think the difficulty also resides in that the engine is not the best match for the transmission. Not only the transmission has close ration gears, also the final drive is geared for very fast acceleration - which means more torque transfer to the wheels.

    So, because of the high torque transfer setup, which is the pull force, any imperfect shifting gets amplified in the way you feel the jerking motion. Also, the car is built very tight, everything from steering to suspension, so you feel every imperfection.

    For my taste, the car revs up way too quickly in first gear.

  9. #17
    Super Mod's Pet qingcong's Avatar
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    If you want to talk about unforgiving, my 1991 Integra required pro level precision. The 9th gen Si manual operation is cake. I may not get smooth launches everytime but it seems much more forgiving in terms of stalling out compared with older manual cars. Also, using AC can have a pretty big impact on shifting behavior.
    2013 SOP Si Sedan

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  10. #18
    Big Timer!!! zrksi's Avatar
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    Try driving bare foor (or with socks)

  11. #19
    I Need A Vacation kev604's Avatar
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    Most sub 200HP 4 cylinder cars are going to drive the same with close ratio low gears to milk the most out of the smaller powerplant. If you want longer gears you need to buy a car with more torque.

    Quote Originally Posted by onlyhuman View Post
    I've owned 5 cars and all were manual. my '14 Si is the least forgiving. Besides all the things mentioned on the posts, I think the difficulty also resides in that the engine is not the best match for the transmission. Not only the transmission has close ration gears, also the final drive is geared for very fast acceleration - which means more torque transfer to the wheels.

    So, because of the high torque transfer setup, which is the pull force, any imperfect shifting gets amplified in the way you feel the jerking motion. Also, the car is built very tight, everything from steering to suspension, so you feel every imperfection.

    For my taste, the car revs up way too quickly in first gear.
    2013 Civic Si sedan PMM

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  12. #20
    Truck? What truck?! scottyrocks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zrksi View Post
    Try driving bare foor (or with socks)
    I have tried this with every MT I have owned. Aside from being illegal here, the lack of shoe weight and the stiffness the sole often made it more difficult to get smooth clutch engagements. But that's me.
    'Three pedals or bust!'
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