9th Gen Civic Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
If you have a CVT automatic, please chime in.
How to drive a CVT? Different behaviour for gas foot?
Off the line, on the straight away maintaining speed, around a corner, downhill, aproaching a red light, passing with quick power, coasting, in crawling traffic, stop and go traffic, slowing down, downshift from D, stomping on the gas, with D and idle.
How do you handle those situations, foot-wise, and how does the car behave/respond?
 

·
Truck? What truck?!
Joined
·
27,071 Posts
I don't own one, but I have driven one. You drive it like a regular AT. The main difference in the car itself is the lack of shifting. The thing just sort of drones on, keeping the ratio at optimal for mpgs, mostly. If you step on it for a 'downshift,' it feels amazingly like a geared AT, stepping down a gear (or two) for speed to pass.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,780 Posts
Scotty gives a pretty accurate description, and had been my experience.
However, I have not driven the latest versions that use a typical automobile torque converter.
The paddle shifters in the CR-z with CVT makes for an interesting, though some what spurious, shifting experience.

Summary:
It's a lot like driving a snow machine, an original Honda Odyssey offroad buggy, or a Rokon motorcycle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
I have a 2014 EX-L and I drive it just like any other car -

The car "Sort Of" shifts up and down, but you have to drive one to actually understand - I have no problems with it, and I drove it back to back with a 2013 when I made the purchase - I have said this before in other threads, but I actually thought it was a 2013 when I did the test drive, because the CVT acted so differently then the CR-Z did… I thought it was the standard trans at first, until I realized it had the pushbutton start, and could not have been a 13...

I had a 2012 CR-Z EX NAV before the Civic, and it did have the paddle shifters to let you "SHIFT" up and down 7-gears - It acted like any other auto with paddle shifter when it was in manual mode - That CVT did not really shift at all - You ramped up to speed, and the RPM's only changed when you changed speeds - On heavy acceleration it went to 4k, 5k, or 6k and stayed there as long as the car was floored...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
846 Posts
The couple of times I've driven cars with a CVT the only thing that was different in my driving than with a regular torque converter AT is getting it moving. Unlike traditional slushboxes that smoothly crawl forward at idle, belt driven CVTs need to be spun up a bit before it really starts pulling on the wheels, so you barely roll than suddenly it engages. setting off with a CVT always felt like a manual that was picking up the clutch too quickly to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,028 Posts
I have one and drive it like a normal AT and I have no issues. It drives like a normal AT.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
The couple of times I've driven cars with a CVT the only thing that was different in my driving than with a regular torque converter AT is getting it moving. Unlike traditional slushboxes that smoothly crawl forward at idle, belt driven CVTs need to be spun up a bit before it really starts pulling on the wheels, so you barely roll than suddenly it engages. setting off with a CVT always felt like a manual that was picking up the clutch too quickly to me.
I just picked up a 2015 Civic EX with CTV on Saturday, and have not noticed this at all. Honda has done SOMETHING different with this CVT, and you get power very quickly. No crawling in this car.

Especially coming from a 2012 Civic LX, the most noticeable thing is how smooth the car drives. I used to feel my car lurch very slightly as it switched gears, especially in stop & go traffic as the car switches gears. This new one doesn't exhibit any behavior like that.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top