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Which car do you believe is the better car?

  • 2012 Honda Civic

    Votes: 45 81.8%
  • 2011 Chevrolet Cruze

    Votes: 2 3.6%
  • 2011 Hyundai Elantra

    Votes: 8 14.5%
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To cut to the chase, the Hyundai Elantra turned out to be the better car with all the testing and information Inside Line had put together. But To you which car is the better car even after reading through this comparison test?




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2012 Honda Civic vs. 2011 Chevrolet Cruze vs. 2011 Hyundai Elantra Comparison Test

Once upon a time, the Honda Civic was the smart guy's economy sedan. It was the one to have if you saw the value in a smooth, efficient engine, a precisely tuned suspension and a functional cabin. Simple ingredients, for sure, but for years nobody put them together as well as Honda.

When you drive the 2012 Honda Civic back to back with the 2011 Chevrolet Cruze and the redesigned 2011 Hyundai Elantra, though, you have to concede that Honda doesn't own this class anymore. The well-tuned chassis underneath the 2011 Cruze makes you realize that GM builds a competitive compact car these days, while Hyundai's latest entry, the attractive 2011 Elantra, packs in a lot of high-end features without inflating its price tag.

And the 2012 Civic? Well, it's revamped, too, but bears signs of serious belt-tightening at Honda as well as unusual ambivalence among company executives about what exactly we want in a compact sedan.

The result is a very conservative ninth-generation Honda Civic and a huge upset in this latest Inside Line economy sedan comparison test.

Three Sub-$25,000 Sedans

Base versions of the 2011 Chevrolet Cruze, 2011 Hyundai Elantra and 2012 Honda Civic start out under $17,000, but that's with a manual transmission and, in Civics and Elantras, no air-conditioning. Few will set your car up like that, so we've specified automatic transmissions and a $25,000 limit for this test.

This netted us three high-line models, which are automatic-only anyway. As-tested prices range from $22,860 for the 2011 Hyundai Elantra Limited to $24,205 for the 2012 Honda Civic EX-L with navigation. In between, there's the 2011 Chevrolet Cruze LTZ for $23,935. We'd planned to include a 2012 Ford Focus as well, but Ford couldn't provide one for this test. Look for a rematch between our winner and the Focus.

Our inner old coot shakes his head at the leather upholstery, USB inputs and Bluetooth connectivity in these so-called economy sedans. The $1,500 premium for a Honda Civic EX-L Navi (over a regular EX-L) does indeed score you a navigation system, while the Hyundai Elantra Limited has one as part of the $2,000 Premium package that includes a back-up camera.

Battle Begins in the Cabin

Right away, the 2011 Hyundai Elantra Limited jumps out in front because it has a richer cabin than we deserve for $23 grand. The leather upholstery is the nicest of the three, the armrests are well padded, and even if the plastic bits aren't actually higher-quality than the 2012 Civic's, the finishes Hyundai used on them look far better. There's probably too much metallic trim, but the stuff adorning the climate control dials is elegant and someone wrote "Bentley" in the logbook — and meant it.

The effectiveness of the Elantra's cabin design goes beyond emotional reactions, as it also integrates a lot of technology in a slick interface. Its 7-inch navigation screen is higher-resolution than the Civic's and looks good enough to use in a Genesis, although the hard drive is smaller. Destination entry and Bluetooth streaming audio setup is quick, easy and, if you so choose, can be done while the car is moving.

If there's a low point in the 2011 Hyundai Elantra Limited's cabin, it's fit and finish, as we note some panel gap inconsistency not seen in the others. But you'd be hard-pressed to find a flawless economy sedan. Even the 2012 Civic has leftover flashing on its injection-molded bits.

Try To Keep Up

Next to the Elantra, the 2012 Honda Civic EX-L Navi's cabin is a letdown. It has the same basic design as last year's cabin right down to the controversial digital speedometer stacked atop an analog tachometer, and the downgraded interior plastics are immediately apparent.

The 6.5-inch nav display is larger than last year's unit, however, and Honda has added an additional LCD screen to the right of the gauge pack called i-MID, which allows you to see your phonebook, iPod album art or personalized wallpaper uploaded via the USB drive. It's an effort to appease millennials with smartphones, but the result is an awkward array of displays competing for your attention. Most of the features are straightforward to use, but no one ever came to the bridge of the Enterprise-D to relax.

We retreat to the grown-up car of the group, the 2011 Chevrolet Cruze LTZ. Chevy managed to not overstyle this cabin, which has a handsome yet restrained two-tone color scheme, three-spoke steering wheel and individual binnacle gauges. This is the oldest design of the three (the Cruze first went on sale in late 2008 in South Korea), but it's going to age the best.

Materials quality is one knock against the Cruze. The soft vinyl trim on the dash is a thoughtful touch, but the plastics used on the door panels and various controls are the worst. Also, the Cruze LTZ costs the same as the others but lacks navigation, Bluetooth audio and a sunroof. But it's the only car with automatic climate control.

Time To Go to Work

Unlike our last economy sedan test, this pack of three doesn't have an obvious driver's car. Here again, though, the 2011 Hyundai Elantra Limited edges to the front, not because it's fantastic in any one area, but because it's competent in most areas.

It starts with adequate power, of course, and all three sedans have that. In fact, all run a 16.9-second quarter-mile with trap speeds in the 81-82 mph range. The Elantra is negligibly slower than the others in the race to 60 mph — using up 9.4 seconds versus 9.2 for the Civic and 9.3 for the Cruze — but it has the friendliest power delivery for cutthroat traffic.

The Elantra's new 148-horsepower, 1.8-liter four-cylinder engine makes useful low- and midrange torque without you having to work at it. And the six-speed automatic transmission driving its front wheels is the quickest with downshifts.

An Ear for Details

If you're an engine connoisseur, you might complain that Hyundai's 1.8-liter feels strained as it nears redline and has a coarse, unmemorable soundtrack. In that case, you can hang with the 2012 Honda Civic EX-L Navi. Predictably for a Honda engine, the Civic's 140-hp, single-cam 1.8-liter four-cylinder is creamy smooth in its delivery and sacrifices low-end grunt in favor of high-rpm power.

That kind of personality usually goes better with a manual gearbox, but it works well enough with the Civic's carryover five-speed automatic. Moreover, there's no real downside in acceleration or fuel economy compared to the six-speed-equipped Elantra. Downshifts could be a tad quicker, but upshifts are the most sophisticated of the bunch. The Honda 2012 Civic has only a 28 city/39 highway mpg rating to the Elantra's 29/40, but we regularly hit 30 mpg in both sedans.

Double-Dog Dare You to Downshift

Although the 2011 Chevrolet Cruze LTZ's iron-block four-cylinder engine only displaces 1.4 liters, it's turbocharged so it's able to crank out 148 pound-feet at just 1,850 rpm — the most torque in the test — along with 138 hp at 4,900 rpm. However, the Cruze also weighs 3,200 pounds (450 more than the Civic), so it usually doesn't feel fast.

Acceleration is further stymied by the car's poorly calibrated six-speed automatic transmission. Ostensibly tuned for the EPA tests, the transmission hurries into 6th gear and will not give you a downshift unless you drive the Cruze like you hate it. Ironically, fuel mileage suffers: We managed just 25 mpg against a 24/36 rating.

This sucks the fun out of driving the Cruze — a real shame since it's otherwise quite competent. If you get lost on some back road, for instance, the Cruze would be a far better companion than the Civic or Elantra. It's the only sedan that feels truly balanced and responsive attacking a corner, plus it has the biggest tires — P225/45R18 Michelin Pilot HX MXM4s.

It's no surprise that the Chevy had the highest slalom (66.7 mph) and skid pad (0.85g) speeds. The Cruze also stopped the shortest (123 feet from 60 mph), and its brakes are the least prone to fade.

I'm All About Comfort

The downside to the 2011 Chevrolet Cruze's sportier setup is an occasionally harsh ride on crumbling freeways. If ride quality is the priority, the 2012 Honda Civic EX-L Navi is our top pick in this group.

That might surprise you since Hondas are not known for cushiness. However, the Civic EX-L isolates you from nasty patches of pavement, yet always feels buttoned-down and engaging.

Well tuned electric-assist power steering contributes to that sense of engagement. All three sedans use EPS, but only the most sensitive hands will pick up on the Civic's.

The steering feel is so good you start thinking the Civic could be fun around corners, but no, there's too much body roll and before long the P205/55R16 Continental tires are out of grip. At 64.6 mph, the Honda was 2 mph slower through the slalom than the Chevy and had the least lateral grip (0.81g).

A bigger liability, though, is the brakes' lack of heat capacity. Our 2012 Civic EX-L Navi couldn't stop shorter than 131 feet from 60 mph, and fade set in immediately.

Full Circle


Meanwhile, the 2011 Hyundai Elantra Limited can't match the Cruze's cornering talent or the Civic's ride quality. Overall, its suspension feels the least sorted. It fumbles over bumps and ruts that the Civic and Cruze deal with expediently.

Yet we rarely notice any lack of composure during highway commutes, and the Elantra's so-so 64.0-mph slalom speed never comes up in happy-hour conversation.

Equally important, the 2011 Hyundai Elantra has more trustworthy brakes than the Honda. It stopped from 60 mph in 125 feet, and managed several consistent stops before fade became an issue.

Sit Yourself Down

Of course, there's no sense in dropping money on any of these sedans if the driver seat won't keep you content during a 2-hour slog.

To no one's surprise, the Honda Civic's seating position draws mixed reviews. Its steering wheel telescopes (all the steering wheels in this test do), but the contouring of the seat and illogical stacking of the gauges only works well for long-legged editors. The long of torso complain bitterly.

The 2011 Hyundai Elantra and Chevrolet Cruze are more universally acceptable, as everybody fits. A lone, bony-butted editor says the Chevy's driver seat is too firm, but the Cruze offers two-way seat-bottom cushion tilt for driver and passenger. No other economy sedan has that.

Although our decibel readings don't quite tell the story, the 2012 Honda Civic lives up to its reputation for excessive wind and road noise. It's not deafening, but the Elantra and especially the Cruze are quieter.

Eventually, you'll make people ride in the backseat, and it's unanimous that the Civic's is the best, as headroom and legroom are adequate for 6-footers. Real-world legroom is similarly plentiful in the Elantra's rear seat, but headroom is tight for our 6-footers. In the Cruze, we face the opposite scenario — ample headroom for CC Sabathia, but zero room for his legs.

Beating Honda at Its Own Game

There's no doubt that the 2012 Honda Civic EX-L Navi, 2011 Chevrolet Cruze LTZ and 2011 Hyundai Elantra Limited all pass muster as commuter cars. None of them ticks all a car guy's boxes, but each has its own personality.

We like the way the Chevrolet Cruze handles, but everyday drivability is seriously compromised by GM's efforts to match the transmission calibration to EPA testing. Similarly, there's a lot to like about the Chevy's cabin design, but the backseat is small, and neither materials quality nor feature content is where it should be for the asking price.

The Honda Civic hasn't radically altered its game for 2012, but gone is the feeling that you're getting more car than you actually paid for — especially in the cabin. The ninth-generation Civic still feels like a quality machine with its refined engine, excellent steering and compliant ride quality. But its brakes are weak, and wind and road noise remain an annoyance.

The real triumph on the 2011 Hyundai Elantra Limited is how well it hides the corporate bean counting. It brings genuine style to the compact car class, and harmonizes form and function in its technology-laden cabin. We may not love driving this car, but Hyundai has focused on make-or-break aspects of the commuter-car experience. So you get a fuel-efficient engine with plenty of torque for passing, a transmission that downshifts exactly when you want it to, and a tolerable freeway ride.

In this test, Hyundai proves it can build an economy sedan that's greater than the sum of its parts — and beat Honda at the game it started.


Top 10 Features:

You may not expect budget cars to pack in many high-end amenities, but today's loaded economy sedans come with a surprising number of safety, convenience and entertainment features, as manufacturers seek to attract financially secure buyers downsizing from larger cars. As a result, many of these formerly would-be-nice items are starting to feel like essentials.


Automatic climate control: You set the temperature and the car takes care of all further cooling, heating and defrosting considerations. It's a nice life and only the 2011 Chevrolet Cruze offers this convenience.

Back-up camera: As time marches on, rear decks are getting higher and rear pillars are getting fatter, so anything that helps when you're backing up is appreciated. A rear camera can save a lot of heartache, and if you pay for the Elantra's optional navigation system ($2,000), it's standard.

Bluetooth streaming audio: Using a cable to connect your iPhone to your car's audio system is so 2009. More to the point, streaming audio is the wave of the future for listening to music in the car, and it's nice to see the freshly redesigned Civic and Elantra offer this feature right off the bat.

Economy mode for transmission: Whether we like it or not, mpg matters in an economy sedan, and sometimes it's nice to get a little help in achieving that coveted 40 mpg. The Civic and the Elantra each offer opt-in economy modes that give you a more gradual throttle curve and a more conservative shift program for the automatic transmission. Obviously, you wouldn't use an economy mode when you're in a hurry to get somewhere, but in low-load situations, both are an unobtrusive means of conserving fuel.

Keyless ignition: No matter what kind of car you're driving, there's a lot to be said for the convenience of leaving the key in your pocket and it's only available on the Hyundai Elantra.

Navigation system: Sure, you could get a Garmin, but it's slowly getting more affordable to have a factory system in the car, and the hard-drive-based systems available in the Civic and Elantra are upgradeable. Both offer traffic information; in the Civic, the updates are FM-based, whereas in the Elantra, they're satellite-radio-based so you'll need to keep your XM subscription current.

Rear seat heaters: Seriously, rear seat heaters? It seems like such an extravagance in May, but come November, we expect all you 2011 Hyundai Elantra owners in Snowbelt states will be very happy.

Rear sonar: Ideally, we'd like to have both a back-up camera and rear sonar, but that's not a combination you can get from the factory in this group of economy sedans. Still, we'd much rather have sonar on the bumper of the Chevy Cruze than none at all.

Sunroof: There's no denying that sunroofs are popular with buyers, and they can quickly jack up the price of a car when you have to buy one as an option. Honda and Hyundai are appeasing the masses by offering extra Vitamin D as standard.

Two-way driver seat-bottom cushion tilt: It sounds like such a little thing, but the ability to tilt the front and rear of the driver-seat bottom cushion separately makes a huge difference in how comfortable and confident you feel behind the wheel. Only the Chevrolet Cruze offers this amenity, and unusually, it's available for both front seats — power two-way tilt for the driver seat and manual two-way tilt for the front-passenger seat. Nice.
 

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Voted for the Hyundai Elantra

Have you seen the optima...............it looks good
 

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I've been in all three. The Elantra I like least, the center console looks like a cheap boombox..

I voted Civic, although I'm not as big a fan of the specifics of the non-Si interior I still like the setup best overall of the three options.
 

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It sounds like they picked the Elantra because it has heated rear seats. Where I live, heated seats are as important as boobs on a bull.
LOL! that's why car reviews are useless and people need to do their own review and assess what they want and not go buy what a magazine says.
 

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I too am going with the Civic. Ride quality, fit and finish, engine refinement, and aftermarket support, ...Civic trumps them both.

...and I'm all for a stacked two tier dash layout. Working as a car salesman and having to drive thousands of different cars in my years in the business, nothing works as well as my 8thGen's layout.

With that said, working for GM, the Cruze's ergonomics can be very confusing. It takes over an hour to properly deliver one to someone that isn't tech savvy, ...or even quite sometime for someone who is. The controls placement is an afterthought and it just seems like a clusterfvck. I've been in several Hyundai's as well and they aren't much better at it as well. Might I add in te new Focus was also unergonimic as well, ...but at least their Sync works nicely.
 

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well first, why compare the 2012 civic to 2011 models? doesnt seem very fair.....second if they are going to keep doing these comparison's then they should include all the competition. it seems like every article picks 3 different cars so everyone's results vary....i would like to see a shootout with at least the top 5....
 

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well first, why compare the 2012 civic to 2011 models? doesnt seem very fair.....second if they are going to keep doing these comparison's then they should include all the competition. it seems like every article picks 3 different cars so everyone's results vary....i would like to see a shootout with at least the top 5....
I was comparing the Elantra to the Civic - and in this review i think its OK to compare the '11 elantra to the '12 coupe. I know nothing about the Cruze.

The '11 and the '12 are the new models for the summer. If it were the other way around i would agree, since the Elantra offers alot more options and little conveniences and technology that lack in the '12 Civic. I would say let the civic catch up...but not the case here since Honda showed their hand on the '12 model, i would expect no changes to the '12 Elantra.

That being said, i would expect more for options on the '13 civic to "catch up" to the other brands features, but i would we weary about getting a new Elantra. This is a true redesign, 1st year with new body style and adding a lot of technology. I would anticipate more issues and or recalls for Hyundai...

Vote: Honda Civic

*I may be arrogant about Chevy but in my mind i am pissed that they took tons of our tax dollars to bail out, now turn record profits...sorry if i am off topic with that rant but would not consider the Cruze in top 10, let alont top 3
 

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i can agree with that....but then again the civic is considered a totally new design by Honda and they are already having problems too.....so dont be to sure about your recall theory. and i agree that the civic interior features lack compared to other models.

well dont single out chevy there, they were not the only ones....and lets be real about it for one second. If they weren't turning out a profit and couldnt repay the bail out money then one of two things would happen......1 its wouldnt be GM anymore, it would be OM (obama motors) or 2 they would have to shut down. GM is not a non profit company, so no profit no business. But i do think that "too big to fail" crap is overly rediculous! my company included!
 

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i can agree with that....but then again the civic is considered a totally new design by Honda and they are already having problems too.....so dont be to sure about your recall theory. and i agree that the civic interior features lack compared to other models.
Remember i am a Honda NOOB...but for the most part, isnt it really a re-skinned 8th gen with a few new bells and whistles? I feel like Hyundai was much much more extreme in their redesign. Interior, exterior, putting alot of tech into it that was not their in the past, etc. Just some observations without REALLY breaking it down and going deep into comparisons. I would never have looked at the Elantra if it wasnt for the new model, but i feel like its less of a risk with the Honda.

well dont single out chevy there, they were not the only ones....and lets be real about it for one second. If they weren't turning out a profit and couldnt repay the bail out money then one of two things would happen......1 its wouldnt be GM anymore, it would be OM (obama motors) or 2 they would have to shut down. GM is not a non profit company, so no profit no business. But i do think that "too big to fail" crap is overly rediculous! my company included!
Yea i hear you, all good points for sure - i pleaded my ignorance up front...:)
 

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at first glance, it does appear to be a facelift of the 8th gen...but i think as we learn more about the car it actually is considered a new design. Only because the exterior has been redone, the interior dash is much different with a few other little tweaks as well inside, and from what i've read a lot of the parts from the 8th wont fit on the 9th....leading me to believe that it is not as clsoe to the 8th as we believe in the beginning.

im a honda noob too, so dont sweat it! :)
 

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Keep in mind, an 'extreme' change isn't always good for a car. It may seem like a 'wow factor' at first, but things like that lead to cars that don't age well, and end up looking old after a year. I see some 2004 Civics that look good enough to be cars coming out this year. This new Civic may be modest, but time will prove the value of a modest design.
 

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Keep in mind, an 'extreme' change isn't always good for a car. It may seem like a 'wow factor' at first, but things like that lead to cars that don't age well, and end up looking old after a year. I see some 2004 Civics that look good enough to be cars coming out this year. This new Civic may be modest, but time will prove the value of a modest design.
Jason,
I have to disagree: "time will prove", actually, I think time has proven the value of a modest design. Cars that get it right from the start and make modest changes, all improvements, rather than all new design along with all the new problems are the lines that are on top. Just think, would you rather have a new generation GM product, whatever it is. Their test track is "public roads and the purchasers of these new products are the test drivers. I learned to drive my parent's 1960 Corvair -what a disaster(144 ci engine only made 1year, inherently imbalanced, generally lasted only 24,000 mi). Many other disasters over the decades such as the nylon timing chain gear on the 71-73 Olds/ Buick/Pontiac 350 engines that resulted in engine failure < 50K mi, and on and on.
I had a new 1989 H Sonata. Terrible experience. I know they have improved significantly, but read the current Consumer's Reports on the Turbo Sonata and Optima.

Jason, as you can tell, we agree completely, as usual.

Yes, the new Elantra is likely a very good product but is not a proven product with "decades" of sterling history like the Honda Civic. I owned a first generation Honda Civic, never had a problem in 4 years of ownership(75-79) and am having the same experience with my 08 Si. The Civic has has 40 years of track record( I'm aware of the criticism of the 72-73 models but don't agree with it: was there) while Hyundai has not and still does not have the refinement that Honda has. NOR the track record!! The gap is closing, though.
The long term track record should be taken more into account in these "comparisons".
Which 10 year old Hyundai or GM compact car would like to own? I'll likely still own my Si in 10 years and it will still be a great car!
 

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Jason, you and sew are absolutely right here! The current generation Sonota has only been out a year or so and it already looks out of date. So much for swooshy-swoopy and flash in the pan design. Honda's always age well. Living in the Bay Area (Cali) I see tons of Accord's and Civic's (California is Honda country - Honda sold 40k new Civic's here last year). I see lots of 6th gen and 7th gen Civic's on the road and they still look very fresh and contemporary. I owned at one time both a 2002 and 2004 Civic (7th gen) and they were excellent cars. The '04 was a more refined version of the '02.
 

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It's a total no-brainer...2012 Honda Civic! Just simply a better overall package than anything else out there in this class. PLUS, the excellent resale value on Honda's can't be beat, period.
 

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Jason,
I have to disagree: "time will prove", actually, I think time has proven the value of a modest design. Cars that get it right from the start and make modest changes, all improvements, rather than all new design along with all the new problems are the lines that are on top. Just think, would you rather have a new generation GM product, whatever it is. Their test track is "public roads and the purchasers of these new products are the test drivers. I learned to drive my parent's 1960 Corvair -what a disaster(144 ci engine only made 1year, inherently imbalanced, generally lasted only 24,000 mi). Many other disasters over the decades such as the nylon timing chain gear on the 71-73 Olds/ Buick/Pontiac 350 engines that resulted in engine failure < 50K mi, and on and on.
I had a new 1989 H Sonata. Terrible experience. I know they have improved significantly, but read the current Consumer's Reports on the Turbo Sonata and Optima.

Jason, as you can tell, we agree completely, as usual.

Yes, the new Elantra is likely a very good product but is not a proven product with "decades" of sterling history like the Honda Civic. I owned a first generation Honda Civic, never had a problem in 4 years of ownership(75-79) and am having the same experience with my 08 Si. The Civic has has 40 years of track record( I'm aware of the criticism of the 72-73 models but don't agree with it: was there) while Hyundai has not and still does not have the refinement that Honda has. NOR the track record!! The gap is closing, though.
The long term track record should be taken more into account in these "comparisons".
Which 10 year old Hyundai or GM compact car would like to own? I'll likely still own my Si in 10 years and it will still be a great car!
That's a given by now my friend. :eek:ccasion14:


@sivik I agree :thumb:
 

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civic
 

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I've been in and tested all 3 and then some when we were looking to buy a car and trade in our 08 Mazda 3 for better mpg.

The Cruze looks very nice, but the front handling in some situations seemed a little to rough. I tested it out but already knew I wasnt going to buy it.
Chevy's fall a apart and dont last long at all. I dont trust them at all from past experiences and friends and familys experiences.

The Elantra looks nice and drove pretty good, but there was something about it that I just hated. I dont know if it was the interior not catching my eye or the exterior looking to spaceship like or what.

The Focus was actually pretty good. Didn't really have much complaints about it.

The Civic was just a smooth quiet ride and right off of the bat I knew I had to have it. First Honda too. I've never driven a car where I cant see the hood while driving, but since buying it and driving it I'm already used to it. Since I did get the LX I had to deal with cheap rims and rear drum brakes. That was a step down from the Mazda, but everything else outweighed it and was an upgrade to me. I didnt care about the loss of power and going from a 2.3l to a 1.8.

I also test drove a Jetta and I actually liked it. The interior did feel cheap, but I just liked the car. The mpg rating is what made me say no off of the bat. I feel they could have done better in that area.
The last car was a Hyundai Acccent. Nice car, but was to close to a Mazda 3 and I considered it a downgrade.
I didnt bother with Toyota. After all of the past recalls I didnt feel like bothering.
 

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I've been in and tested all 3 and then some when we were looking to buy a car and trade in our 08 Mazda 3 for better mpg.

The Cruze looks very nice, but the front handling in some situations seemed a little to rough. I tested it out but already knew I wasnt going to buy it.
Chevy's fall a apart and dont last long at all. I dont trust them at all from past experiences and friends and familys experiences.

The Elantra looks nice and drove pretty good, but there was something about it that I just hated. I dont know if it was the interior not catching my eye or the exterior looking to spaceship like or what.

The Focus was actually pretty good. Didn't really have much complaints about it.

The Civic was just a smooth quiet ride and right off of the bat I knew I had to have it. First Honda too. I've never driven a car where I cant see the hood while driving, but since buying it and driving it I'm already used to it. Since I did get the LX I had to deal with cheap rims and rear drum brakes. That was a step down from the Mazda, but everything else outweighed it and was an upgrade to me. I didnt care about the loss of power and going from a 2.3l to a 1.8.

I also test drove a Jetta and I actually liked it. The interior did feel cheap, but I just liked the car. The mpg rating is what made me say no off of the bat. I feel they could have done better in that area.
The last car was a Hyundai Acccent. Nice car, but was to close to a Mazda 3 and I considered it a downgrade.
I didnt bother with Toyota. After all of the past recalls I didnt feel like bothering.
Congrats on your new 2012 Civic. My fav color is also the Dyno Blue Pearl. I wholeheartedly agree, the all new Civic is definitely the best in the C-segment.
 
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