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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone. I have some previous posts about some CVT shenanigans that my girl's car was doing. We took it to a couple of shops and they couldn't definitively say that it was "broken" but just suggested to replace/rebuild.

Well, fast forward about 10 months and 16k miles, I believe it has finally bit the dust at 210k. The car starts fine, engages reverse, drive, etc. but as soon as you let off the brake the car jerks every couple of feet. This is in drive and reverse. Symptoms leading up to this have been a shudder from approx 15mph-35mph of varying intensity depending on throttle input.

So - my lady bought a '19 Civic as a replacement and I now own her old Civic EX coupe. I would love to fix this car and use it as my DD especially when gas prices are so atrocious. The car is in overall nice condition and I recently did a valve adjustment, newer tires, etc.

The issue is the CVT prices have absolutely gone through the roof (even in the past 10 months). We got a quote of under $2,900 for a lower mile used replacement or about $3,400 for a rebuild in Sept 2021. Now a rebuild seems to be off the table because parts are hard to find and no one except Honda makes them. Used swaps are now $4k + and that seems crazy for something that maybe has a 6mo warranty.

My question is - is the 14-15 Civic CVT compatible with any other Honda CVT? I have noticed a lot of used "automatic" transmissions for CNG Civics - I am assuming these are a normal 5 speed auto?

Has anyone had experience in swapping OR rebuilding one of these? I was told the subframe has to come down and the trans comes out from the bottom. Sounds like a sucky job, but I do work on cars and have dropped/installed a transmission before.

Looking for input from anyone that has the knowledge!

Thanks!
 

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they are problematic, which is why replacements are hard to find and expensive.

have you tried the 3x drain and fills, and add some lubeguard for cvt to the transmission oil?

might be your cheapest gamble at this point.

Edit: get your cvt oil from the dealer, have not seen any decent aftermarket comparisons, so when in doubt go with Honda original.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
they are problematic, which is why replacements are hard to find and expensive.

have you tried the 3x drain and fills, and add some lubeguard for cvt to the transmission oil?

might be your cheapest gamble at this point.
Yeah it seems like these are difficult model years since it’s only 14-15. I am assuming the 16+ is not interchangeable?

As in doing a “flush” essentially with all new fluid? I did a drain/refill around the time we started taking it to the shop and it slightly helped but not totally.


What post #2 above says...
Also, I would be suspect of any rebuilt CVT transmissions.
Unless they came from Honda Reman.
Yeah most shops are saying they can get it from Honda. Only two places said they can rebuild with genuine Honda parts.
 

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Yeah it seems like these are difficult model years since it’s only 14-15. I am assuming the 16+ is not interchangeable?

As in doing a “flush” essentially with all new fluid? I did a drain/refill around the time we started taking it to the shop and it slightly helped but not totally.




Yeah most shops are saying they can get it from Honda. Only two places said they can rebuild with genuine Honda parts.
so you did 1 drain and fill, do another drive it for a day or two then do a third, then add your lubeguard cvt additive.
 

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I'd try what @2013ACURAILX says. His 3x drain/refill strategy is sound, and it could work. A single drain / refill replaces about 62% of the CVTF. Approx 3.8 quarts should drain out of the sump (out of a total capacity of 6.1 quarts). If you do this three times like he mentions, namely ...
  1. Drain, refill, drive it around...
  2. ...then, drain, refill again, drive it around...
  3. ...then, drain, refill along with a bottle of Lubegard CVT Recharge and Protect (p/n 67010, it's a 10-ounce yellow bottle, only for CVT's).
Lubegard says not to exceed 2 ounces of their CVT Recharge and Protect product per quart of ATF capacity, so the entire bottle is appropriate.

You end up replacing about 95% of the CVTF with just three of these. It's a solid result, and that along with the Lubegard CVT Recharge and Protect (yellow bottle, p/n 67010) might greatly assist in restoring proper function.

I don't know why Acura and Honda transmissions that are exhibiting problems can often respond so well to Lubegard additives.
  • I've fixed horrendous torque converter shudder on a 6th Gen I4 Accord using Lubegard Red (p/n 60902, red bottle, for regular automatics, not CVT's).
  • I've fixed power steering whine using their PSF protectant (purple bottle) in two Odysseys, my Acura, and an 8th Gen I4 Accord .. you get the idea.
  • I use Lubegard Red in two 9th Gen Civics (conventional A/T's), two 8th Gen Accords (conventional A/T's), a 2nd Gen Odyssey (got rid of an annoying reverse gear clunk) and a 2nd Gen Acura TL.
  • Wife and kids say the Accords and Civics drive smoother .... "Dad, what did you do to my car; it runs a little quieter and smoother." :cool: I haven't told them that I added Lubegard Red.
  • I owe JerryO on the Odyclub forums multiple cases of beer for informing me of the existence of this stuff.
Art's Automotive on the east coast of SF Bay has been around for decades, and they've used Lubegard ATF additives to rescue problematic transmission operating issues with Honda & Acura transmissions that, if unsolved, would have called for pulling out the transmission.

My daughter's 2014 Civic LX had 100,000 miles on it when we bought it fall of last year, and no documented CVTF changes. I purchased a 12-quart case of Honda HCF2 CVTF and did a drain / refill in the spring of this year. I'll do one more in the late summer of this year, and the third (and last) one in the fall. I've got that yellow bottle of Lubegard CVT Recharge & Protect sitting in my oil & ATF cabinet, ready to go for the last one.

Just trying to keep it going by giving it a "fresh start" with a mostly fresh load of CVTF during this first year of ownership, along with the Lubegard (yellow bottle) to preserve the fluid characteristics of the CVTF.

OF

EDITED: My numbers were off. Single drain / refill changes out 62% of the CVTF, not 68%...not much difference. Three drains / refills gives you about 95% new, fresh CVTF, which is really, really good. I previously had 86% in this post...95% is mo' bettah.

I used an online spreadsheet that does not appear to use the correct exponential dilution formula, so I did it by scratch on my calculator to get the correct #'s. OF
 

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lubeguard cvt additive.
Lubegard CVT Recharge and Protect (p/n 67010, it's a 10-ounce yellow bottle, only for CVT's).
Under different circumstances I would be strongly opposed to the use of any "ADDITIVE" in any Honda system.
But, in the OP's case he really has nothing to lose by using Lubeguard.
 

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There are two products I swear by, that are actually miracles in a bottle and not bs
ATP AT-205
Lubeguard AT additives
I heartily concur. I fixed two significant rear main seal leaks on our pair of Gen 2 Odysseys a few years ago with ATP AT-205. Lubegard transmission products for all seven family Honda / Acura vehicles.

OF
 

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Discussion Starter #11
so you did 1 drain and fill, do another drive it for a day or two then do a third, then add your lubeguard cvt additive.
Yes, I did a drain/refill. The car isn't drive-able at this point unfortunately. I'm going to have to get the front end up in the air and put it in "D" and see where the binding seems to be originating from. The car will barely move 100' without feeling like it's going to break.

I'd try what @2013ACURAILX says. His 3x drain/refill strategy is sound, and it could work. A single drain / refill replaces about 62% of the CVTF. Approx 3.8 quarts should drain out of the sump (out of a total capacity of 6.1 quarts). If you do this three times like he mentions, namely ...
  1. Drain, refill, drive it around...
  2. ...then, drain, refill again, drive it around...
  3. ...then, drain, refill along with a bottle of Lubegard CVT Recharge and Protect (p/n 67010, it's a 10-ounce yellow bottle, only for CVT's).
Lubegard says not to exceed 2 ounces of their CVT Recharge and Protect product per quart of ATF capacity, so the entire bottle is appropriate.

You end up replacing about 95% of the CVTF with just three of these. It's a solid result, and that along with the Lubegard CVT Recharge and Protect (yellow bottle, p/n 67010) might greatly assist in restoring proper function.

I don't know why Acura and Honda transmissions that are exhibiting problems can often respond so well to Lubegard additives.
  • I've fixed horrendous torque converter shudder on a 6th Gen I4 Accord using Lubegard Red (p/n 60902, red bottle, for regular automatics, not CVT's).
  • I've fixed power steering whine using their PSF protectant (purple bottle) in two Odysseys, my Acura, and an 8th Gen I4 Accord .. you get the idea.
  • I use Lubegard Red in two 9th Gen Civics (conventional A/T's), two 8th Gen Accords (conventional A/T's), a 2nd Gen Odyssey (got rid of an annoying reverse gear clunk) and a 2nd Gen Acura TL.
  • Wife and kids say the Accords and Civics drive smoother .... "Dad, what did you do to my car; it runs a little quieter and smoother." :cool: I haven't told them that I added Lubegard Red.
  • I owe JerryO on the Odyclub forums multiple cases of beer for informing me of the existence of this stuff.
Art's Automotive on the east coast of SF Bay has been around for decades, and they've used Lubegard ATF additives to rescue problematic transmission operating issues with Honda & Acura transmissions that, if unsolved, would have called for pulling out the transmission.

My daughter's 2014 Civic LX had 100,000 miles on it when we bought it fall of last year, and no documented CVTF changes. I purchased a 12-quart case of Honda HCF2 CVTF and did a drain / refill in the spring of this year. I'll do one more in the late summer of this year, and the third (and last) one in the fall. I've got that yellow bottle of Lubegard CVT Recharge & Protect sitting in my oil & ATF cabinet, ready to go for the last one.

Just trying to keep it going by giving it a "fresh start" with a mostly fresh load of CVTF during this first year of ownership, along with the Lubegard (yellow bottle) to preserve the fluid characteristics of the CVTF.

OF

EDITED: My numbers were off. Single drain / refill changes out 62% of the CVTF, not 68%...not much difference. Three drains / refills gives you about 95% new, fresh CVTF, which is really, really good. I previously had 86% in this post...95% is mo' bettah.

I used an online spreadsheet that does not appear to use the correct exponential dilution formula, so I did it by scratch on my calculator to get the correct #'s. OF
Thank you for putting all of that together. Great info! I have taken pretty good care of this CVT because I am suspicious of them in general. The only time changing the fluid really lagged was the first change, it was done closer to 50k than 30k, but everything else has been on or ahead of schedule.

Under different circumstances I would be strongly opposed to the use of any "ADDITIVE" in any Honda system.
But, in the OP's case he really has nothing to lose by using Lubeguard.
Before I do anything, I am going to start ruling stuff out. I may pull the pan and see if there's any debris in the bottom depending on what the drain plug magnet says. I did notice the last time I did the fluid drain/refill, there were some metal particles (not just sludge) on the magnet. Not totally covered, but maybe it was a sign.

@Shifting_Gears , keep us posted. Keeping fingers crossed that the CVT is not a lost cause.

OF
Fingers crossed too, but I think it's a goner. I would be SHOCKED if this one was fixable. I have been looking for used units, but the price gouging is unreal. Best I have found is $2,500 or so for something without a million miles on it (just under 100k). The 16+ CVT's are literally $400-$1,000 for almost new units. It's insane... my lady bought a '19 so in my head I want to just get one for a standby... LOL.
 

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I'm also curious. There's also a filter behind the fluid cooler lines.
If Trans needs a replacement. I would try to put a 12-13 5spd AT in. (Never looked into it. Seems possible)
 

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I keep wondering how many of these CVT's are going to fail in the 14-15 Civic's every time threads like this pop-up. The average price range for a used 14-15 CVT transmission seem to around $2K to $3K, and the 12-13 5-speed automatic transmissions are around $200 to $600 used with low mileage. If it were my vehicle, I'd be looking a CVT to AT conversion and see if it's even possible without changing the ECU module & wiring harness.
 

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I keep wondering how many of these CVT's are going to fail in the 14-15 Civic's every time threads like this pop-up. The average price range for a used 14-15 CVT transmission seem to around $2K to $3K, and the 12-13 5-speed automatic transmissions are around $200 to $600 used with low mileage. If it were my vehicle, I'd be looking a CVT to AT conversion and see if it's even possible without changing the ECU module & wiring harness.
6speed manual ftw


Sent from my iPhone 13 Pro while on the toilet.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I'm also curious. There's also a filter behind the fluid cooler lines.
If Trans needs a replacement. I would try to put a 12-13 5spd AT in. (Never looked into it. Seems possible)
I replaced that filter. What’s funny is it’s “lifetime” but it was definitely beneficial to replace it.

I had the same thought. They are WAY cheaper and a dime a dozen. If the electronics portion aren’t a total nightmare with the ECU I am definitely open to that. I would imagine it would mount up without any issue since it was already present on that body style.

I keep wondering how many of these CVT's are going to fail in the 14-15 Civic's every time threads like this pop-up. The average price range for a used 14-15 CVT transmission seem to around $2K to $3K, and the 12-13 5-speed automatic transmissions are around $200 to $600 used with low mileage. If it were my vehicle, I'd be looking a CVT to AT conversion and see if it's even possible without changing the ECU module & wiring harness.
The transmission has been issue free until it was in the 190k range. At that time, it threw the car into limp mode and threw a code related to a speed sensor. That’s when we started looking at rebuilds initially. The code was cleared and the car continued to drive 100% fine, other than a slight shudder between 15-35mph under acceleration.

I found a local CVT with 36k for $2,600. That’s by far the best I have seen yet. I have seen them as high as $3,600. It’s insane.

6speed manual ftw


Sent from my iPhone 13 Pro while on the toilet.
Also open to that, but again comes down to the headache of the total swap.
 

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Wish I could respond with first hand knowledge... regarding transmission swaps other than another CVT.
But I have none.
However, if your state has emissions testing. A transmission other than what it came with would likely cause the car to fail.
 
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