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I bought an impact wrench for removing those screws because at times it was handy to use the screws to hold the disc in place. Covered them in anti-sieze just like the rotor hub perimeter and center. Last time I used it the bit shattered so I had to drill the screws out. Now I use lug nuts to hold the discs on like I have now as I am bleeding the system.

Rented the Autozone Disc Brake Caliper tool #27111 from the rent-a-tool and that works great for compressing the rear calipers while screwing them in. Bought and returned. No cost.

Buddy suggested this 3/8" dice tool for next time so I don't have to make a trip. http://www.autozone.com/test-scan-and-specialty-tools/brake-tool/oem-rear-disc-brake-cube-for-use-with-3-8-in-drive-tool/2363_0_0/
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I bought an impact wrench for removing those screws because at times it was handy to use the screws to hold the disc in place. Covered them in anti-sieze just like the rotor hub perimeter and center. Last time I used it the bit shattered so I had to drill the screws out. Now I use lug nuts to hold the discs on like I have now as I am bleeding the system.

Rented the Autozone Disc Brake Caliper tool #27111 from the rent-a-tool and that works great for compressing the rear calipers while screwing them in. Bought and returned. No cost.

Buddy suggested this 3/8" dice tool for next time so I don't have to make a trip. http://www.autozone.com/test-scan-and-specialty-tools/brake-tool/oem-rear-disc-brake-cube-for-use-with-3-8-in-drive-tool/2363_0_0/
When I was replacing the rear disc pads on my dad's 2006 Accord, I was not expecting a screw type on high volume Japanese car. I am glad I saw this on an Audi A6 when I did a rear brake job for a friend. I bought an identical set to work on my Honda rear brakes: Mac Tools Disc Brake Caliper Set DBC2500MA | eBay
 

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When I was replacing the rear disc pads on my dad's 2006 Accord, I was not expecting a screw type on high volume Japanese car. I am glad I saw this on an Audi A6 when I did a rear brake job for a friend. I bought an identical set to work on my Honda rear brakes: Mac Tools Disc Brake Caliper Set DBC2500MA | eBay
Nice. I have normally used a retardly stupid large screwdriver (I don't know when I inherited it or what it was for) to do the job but one slip and good-bye $160 rear caliper rubber. The AZ tool can be bought for $60 new as an option but I am sure the MAC even used is much nicer. Just depends on how many times you use it.
My 8th Gen calipers have been sticking a bit in the rear so it would be nice to have a tool like this and depress then squish and depress them again just to get rid of any ridges in the piston cylinder. Say to purge any debris in the line without going nuts.

/trying to figure out just how much StopTech STR6000 fluid I will go thru purging this system. Not cheap at ?$15 for 500ml.
 

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A must have is a large bottle of anti-sieze. The rotors are mild steel just like hockey goalie skate blades and rust really quickly. The hub is not coated that I can tell and the two like to become one. I paint my hubs a light silver and I still have to bang on the rears to get them off due to the salt in Michigan. At the first pad change on my 9th I am going to paint my calipers and caliper guides, then put speed bleeders in.
 

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Great advice. I always spray the hub with copper anti seize before installing a new rotor or even putting and old one back on. Also when installing a new rotor make sure to clean it with brake clean before installing. Manufacturer's coat rotors with oil so they won't rust in the box. Make sure to clean that off.

Another great tool for a brake job is a six pack. Maybe that's just me though.
 

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When I was changing my rotors out, I couldn't even get them off with the impact screwdriver. Since they were pretty torn up at that point, I ended up using a step drill bit and just drilled out the heads which allowed the rest of the screw body to turn easily. I forget which forums I read it at (maybe the Accord?), but someone recommended swapping out the screws for these:
McMaster-Carr
which are the same size as the phillips screws in the rotor but are hex instead of phillips, which will allow you to get more turning power than with a screwdriver. You have to buy 25 of them though, so I just handed out some of the extras to friends who have Hondas and do their own work. I put some anti-seize on when I installed them and it was very easy to remove one when I tried about 2 months later.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
When I was changing my rotors out, I couldn't even get them off with the impact screwdriver. Since they were pretty torn up at that point, I ended up using a step drill bit and just drilled out the heads which allowed the rest of the screw body to turn easily. I forget which forums I read it at (maybe the Accord?), but someone recommended swapping out the screws for these:
McMaster-Carr
which are the same size as the phillips screws in the rotor but are hex instead of phillips, which will allow you to get more turning power than with a screwdriver. You have to buy 25 of them though, so I just handed out some of the extras to friends who have Hondas and do their own work. I put some anti-seize on when I installed them and it was very easy to remove one when I tried about 2 months later.
You are correct! If impact fails then the drill is your best friend (I have done both).
 

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When I was changing my rotors out, I couldn't even get them off with the impact screwdriver. Since they were pretty torn up at that point, I ended up using a step drill bit and just drilled out the heads which allowed the rest of the screw body to turn easily. I forget which forums I read it at (maybe the Accord?), but someone recommended swapping out the screws for these:
McMaster-Carr
which are the same size as the phillips screws in the rotor but are hex instead of phillips, which will allow you to get more turning power than with a screwdriver. You have to buy 25 of them though, so I just handed out some of the extras to friends who have Hondas and do their own work. I put some anti-seize on when I installed them and it was very easy to remove one when I tried about 2 months later.
The screws are only there for holding the rotors on at the factory. They are pointless to reinstall.
 

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Had a impact screwdriver for a few years now.I bought it for my 8th discs.Pretty damn handy.


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Shortly after receiving my 13 Civic, I loosen the front and rear rotor screws with the impact screw driver. Did the same thing on 13 Accord too and a good practice if you don't want any trouble later.
 

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I've had a Harbor Freight impact driver for about 20 years. Much cheaper but it does the job. Great tool.
 

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Back from the dead. Word on the street is you take to ball peen and put it on the the screw and give it a whack with another hammer then proceed to use a regular #3 screw driver and turn by hand. Been doing that for 16+ years and hasn't failed me yet. And let's be real here, if they were much easier to remove, more people would put them back in. I like having the mental satisfaction that everything I took off was put back on.

Note: this works if its the first time. if someone else has attempted or messed up the screw results may differ.
 
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