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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I've got a '13 civic SI bone stock. Want to change my fluid and after looking at diagrams of the brake line I'm not sure which bleeder I should drain from first and consecutively to the last. I have a vacuum pump. What do you guys recommend?
 

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Vacuum bleed should be fine. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions.
That said I have always used the pump, hold, bleed method.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks!! That's perfect. I'll be the only one available for this so I got a vacuum pump. Do you have a location for a service manual?
 

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Interesting. It has been generally accepted that you start bleeding at the caliper furthest from the master cylinder and work your way closer, but your illustration depicts the bleeding sequence opposite of that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Who has said that? You don't want old fluid going through the length of the system. You want to drain it quickly.
 

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Who has said that? You don't want old fluid going through the length of the system. You want to drain it quickly.
Step 4 here - How To Bleed Your Brakes



Not sayin' the illustration is wrong; it's just different from what I've traditionally read and done.
 

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Thanks!! That's perfect. I'll be the only one available for this so I got a vacuum pump.

Do you have a location for a service manual?
There is no such thing for 2012 and later Civic.
Click the link in my sig line.
 

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Just did mine in August. My 13 Si has around 90k miles on it. I replaced all my brake bleeder valves with speed bleeders, so I just cracked them open and stomped the brake pedal 5 or so times and topped off the reservoir. It still would be easier with 2-3 people, but it went fine. I also mostly read that it was common convention to start with furthest first, and that's what I ended up doing, even though it's opposite from what's recommended for this car. I figured neither way can really be that much worse than the other, so long as you're getting all the fluid out. Also, my fluid looked pretty damn ok for 90k miles. Not sure if it even needed changing.
 

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Also, my fluid looked pretty damn ok for 90k miles. Not sure if it even needed changing.
That's not really a good way to determine if your brake fluid needed changing or not (although, if the fluid is dark like muddy water, you've gone way too long and there may be problems elsewhere in the system). You need a Refractometer to measure brake fluid water content and boiling point.
I think that we all know that automotive brake fluid is “Hygroscopic.” That means that it won’t take long for brake fluid to absorb moisture directly from the air, even in a sealed braking system.
Brand-new brake fluid contains roughly 0.1% water, but the water content can increase by 1% (or more) every year of service life. It is generally recommended that anything over 4% water content is dangerous. That isn't much, which is why most OEM service guides will recommend brake fluid replacement every 2-3 years.
Did you know that 2% water reduces the boiling point of DOT3 brake fluid by approximately 135 degrees Fahrenheit (75 degrees Celsius)?
Slightly better is DOT4; 2% water in DOT4 brake fluid reduces boiling point by 81 degrees Fahrenheit (45 degrees Celsius).
 

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Just did mine in August. My 13 Si has around 90k miles on it. I replaced all my brake bleeder valves with speed bleeders, so I just cracked them open and stomped the brake pedal 5 or so times and topped off the reservoir. It still would be easier with 2-3 people, but it went fine. I also mostly read that it was common convention to start with furthest first, and that's what I ended up doing, even though it's opposite from what's recommended for this car. I figured neither way can really be that much worse than the other, so long as you're getting all the fluid out.

Also, my fluid looked pretty damn ok for 90k miles. Not sure if it even needed changing.
Brake fluid should be replaced every 3 years, regardless of appearance.
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The fastest way without introducing air in the lines is super simple. Do it twice a year and you'll be golden.
I've always done my cars this way unless I've cracked a line open for whatever reason.

Step one get a chemical syringe. A big fat one.
Step 2 open master cylinder and remove the plastic dampener.
Step 3 suck 90 percent of fluid out.
Step 4 replace fluid with correct fluid.
Step 5 replace cap. Go drive down the block. Get car up to 60 and then hit the brake progressively several times.
Step 6 do steps 1-4 again and you'll be fine.
Do this every 6 months or so and you should never have to crack a bleeder screw open ever.
 
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