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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)


The safest compact car on the market is the Honda Civic, according to new crash test results released by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), with half of all small cars receiving top marks.

Of 12 cars evaluated in the latest round of crash tests, which include the new small overlap crash tests only the Civic (both coupe and sedan) earned a rating of “good” in the test.

An additional four cars: the Dodge Dart, Hyundai Elantra, Ford Focus and Scion tC earned an “acceptable” rating, which when combined with their other crash tests results is enough to also give them a Top Safety Pick+ award.

In total, just 25 cars on the market have received the Top Safety Pick+ rating since it was introduced last year. The + rating includes the small overlap test shows what happens when the front corner of a car strikes another vehicle or a pole at a speed of 40 mph..

Of vehicles testes, the Nissan Sentra, Kia Forte and Soul fared the worst, receiving a “poor” rating – the worst possible.

The Sentra suffered from significant occupant area intrusion during the crash while the Forte suffered from both structural issues and poorly functioning restraint systems. As a result of excessive slack in the seat belt, the dummy in the Forte hit the windshield pillar and instrument panel.

“The small cars with marginal or poor ratings had some of the same structural and restraint system issues as other models we’ve tested,” says David Zuby, the Institute’s chief research officer. “In the worst cases safety cages collapsed, driver airbags moved sideways with unstable steering columns and the dummy’s head hit the instrument panel. Side curtain airbags didn’t deploy or didn’t provide enough forward coverage to make a difference. All of this adds up to marginal or poor protection in a small overlap crash.”

In the case of the VW Beetle, the steering column tilted 5-inches in the crash. Combined with excessive seat belt slack, the dummy hit its head on the dashboard. Another low scorer was the Chevrolet Sonic, in which the side airbag deployed too late. The Beetle, Sonic and Chevrolet Cruze all earned “marginal” ratings.

While results varied significantly in IIHS testing, all cars conform to current government crash testing procedures. In addition to the small overlap crash test, IIHS testing includes a moderate overlap front crash, side impact and rollover test, plus evaluations of restraint systems. From best to worst, the IIHS rating system awards vehicles a score of good, acceptable, marginal or poor.

Overall, compact cars fared worse than mid-size sedans, but better than small crossovers and SUVs. The IIHS will release the results of minicars later this year.
Read the complete story on small car crash tests at AutoGuide.com
 

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These ratings from IIHS really mean a lot to the Insurance companies. My insurance only went up about $260 a year for my 13 Si. Not bad considering my previous car was a 2003 Civic EX. It was a very pleasant surprise!
 

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my insurance went down 12 bucks a month since my last car a red 06 eclipse, and now i have a faster car costing less. WIN!
 

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2013 sedan:

2013 coupe:

2010/11 coupe:

2006-11 sedan:

As you can see, all Civics since 2006 do an excellent job ar keeping the passenger compartment intact, and passengers safe from hard impacts at 40 mph into a fixed barrier at the specified angle.

I, for one, am not worried about how my 2012 would perform in this situation.
 

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The Kia Forte's passenger compartment is significantly compromised:

 

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The Kia Soul seems to have the same problem, if not worse. I feel bad for the mice if they hit something in their Soul.

 

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Then there's always this classic, just for laughs:

 

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The current Elantra. Our Civics do better than all these.

 

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A Big Reason To Buy A Civic...

IIHS-HLDI

We haul our grandkids every day. This was a biggie for me. My second choice (Cruze) faired poorly. The Dart was rated acceptable in the small offset crash test even though the driver's door hinges tore out.

This site has previous model year ratings also.
 

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Hmm thats why we own 4 Hondas.Ima Honda junkie
Mine: 2013 Civic Coupe
Wife: 2011 Civic Sedan
Daughter: 2006 Accord
Daughter: 2009 Fit
 

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Here's the 2012 Civic coupe crash test

Looks like its pretty good also for all those idiots who bashed the new 9th design WHAT NOW!!!
 

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Looks like its pretty good also for all those idiots who bashed the new 9th design WHAT NOW!!!
I didn't post that one because the barrier was different, so there was no basis for comparison with all the others.
 

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scottyrocks, I have seen that 2009 vs 1959 crash test before and had to wonder if they hadn't compromised the 1959 somehow. It DOES seem like the older cars [with thicker metal] would rip new cars up, . . . but if it was a non compromised 1959, the results are obvious and dramatic for sure.

My family used to have a 1072 Dodge Polara. Huge. Heavy metal. LONG nose. I wonder how well it would have done in this kind of crash test? :-/
 

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The 1959 Impala, in particular, became known for an extremely weak structure. Also, keep in mind that back then, the term 'crush zones' may have applied to certain sports, but not cars. Other than sheer bulk, there was no thought to crash protection. That '59 Impala was particular to that car, and Chevrolet, if they had wanted to do that production years earlier, may have waited until 2009 to illustrate the 'dramatic' difference 50 years have made.

Except for Volvo. I remember as far back as the late 1960s, Volvos' biggest selling point was the reinforced passenger compartment. Their famous commercials showed seven 144s stacked on top of one another with no deformity to any of the cars, including the bottom one, which was the point. No one else was building cars like that back then, or at least no one was advertising them that way..
 

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2013 sedan:

2010/11 coupe:

2006-11 sedan:

As you can see, all Civics since 2006 do an excellent job ar keeping the passenger compartment intact, and passengers safe from hard impacts at 40 mph into a fixed barrier at the specified angle.

I, for one, am not worried about how my 2012 would perform in this situation.
I think those other Civic crash tests (before 2013) were the "moderate" overlap test... the later ones are the new "small" overlap crash which puts the heavier force on the a-pillar. I am sure the older ones would do just as well though.

Then there's always this classic, just for laughs:

The 1959 Impala, in particular, became known for an extremely weak structure. Also, keep in mind that back then, the term 'crush zones' may have applied to certain sports, but not cars. Other than sheer bulk, there was no thought to crash protection. That '59 Impala was particular to that car, and Chevrolet, if they had wanted to do that production years earlier, may have waited until 2009 to illustrate the 'dramatic' difference 50 years have made.

Except for Volvo. I remember as far back as the late 1960s, Volvos' biggest selling point was the reinforced passenger compartment. Their famous commercials showed seven 144s stacked on top of one another with no deformity to any of the cars, including the bottom one, which was the point. No one else was building cars like that back then, or at least no one was advertising them that way..
Yeah, these particular Chevy's had the "X-frame" which many old car fans will say is a weak frame. Too bad they didn't test other old cars as a comparison, but would be a shame to see classics crashed up. A lot of people assumed that since this old '59 Chevy car did poorly that all old cars would perform this same way, but I don't think so. A '59 Buick had a full box frame... may have made a difference, not sure. I guess we will never know. lol. It was like by the 90s... some cars were doing good in this test, while others did terrible. I once seen a '73 Impala that had been in an off-set crash with a large truck at a high speed... the passenger cage was totally intact, but the '73 had a totally different frame than this '59. Like you said as well... crush zones/reinforced passenger compartments also play a part I am sure... many of the 50s cars didn't have them I am sure (at least crush zones). I think Mercedes did however. Also by the late 60s, cars started adding safety such as mandatory seatbelts, padded dash panels, energy absorbing steering columns, (some even a few years earlier), etc. Here is that '73 Impala wagon... someone said this car was hit head-on by a dump truck at a high rate of speed... this is also a 5000 pound car. They are tanks. I actually have one like it.
 

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Thanks for the details on what I had written. :)

I think those other Civic crash tests (before 2013) were the "moderate" overlap test... the later ones are the new "small" overlap crash which puts the heavier force on the a-pillar. I am sure the older ones would do just as well though.
Yes, I had noticed that the barriers were different. A number of the cars in the videos I posted had their doors ripped clean off. That was definitely due to the barrier, and the more head-on nature of the crash, as opposed to the earlier standard test.

The original question was if the 2012s would fare as well as the '13s, which I believe they would, too. I also think that the 8th gens would have done just as well.
 

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Thanks for the details on what I had written. :)



Yes, I had noticed that the barriers were different. A number of the cars in the videos I posted had their doors ripped clean off. That was definitely due to the barrier, and the more head-on nature of the crash, as opposed to the earlier standard test.

The original question was if the 2012s would fare as well as the '13s, which I believe they would, too. I also think that the 8th gens would have done just as well.
Thanks for the videos and information Scotty! :)


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