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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys!

I already own a 2013 Honda Civic Sedan EX Automatic (1.8L). Recently, I've been wanting to buy a manual car whether it be Honda or not doesn't matter. I know the basics and I have driven a manual car a couple of times in a parking lot so I am still relatively new to the experience. Can anyone give suggestions on what kind of car is "easiest" to learn on if that is even possible? I plan on keeping my current Civic as it is paid off and reliable. Thank you for the info!

Regards,
Jake K.
 

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Anything Japanese is pretty easy to drive. Most European stuff is too. I think Honda has a great shifter feel compared to its counterparts. The VW's I've had were pretty nice, and the few manual BMWs ive driven were great. American manuals usually have a pretty stiff clutch, i.e camaros and mustangs. Cobalts and cavaliers neons stuff like that are too sloppy in my opinion.
 

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I've driven a slew of MTs, and bf's descriptions are pretty darn accurate, afaic.

My R18 5MT is a blast to drive - easy, peppy (for my wants and needs), economical - you know, the usual stuff.

Jake, are you planning on buying new or used? If new, it may be tough to find MTs in dealer showrooms, depending on model, brand, and dealer.

Drive as many different cars as you can so you can get one that is closest to what you want. Don't rush just to purchase something. Hasty decisions can be costly.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I've driven a slew of MTs, and bf's descriptions are pretty darn accurate, afaic.

My R18 5MT is a blast to drive - easy, peppy (for my wants and needs), economical - you know, the usual stuff.

Jake, are you planning on buying new or used? If new, it may be tough to find MTs in dealer showrooms, depending on model, brand, and dealer.

Drive as many different cars as you can so you can get one that is closest to what you want. Don't rush just to purchase something. Hasty decisions can be costly.
Hey there Scotty & BF! Thank you.

I will most likely be buying used since I would prefer to not have a monthly payment. I am assuming a private 3rd party seller would be my best bet at this time as I don't want to be bothered with negotiating with a dealer.

Thanks again!
 

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For the most part, any modern car is going to be fairly beginner friendly. Probably the worst modern drivetrains come out of Subaru. They have a lot of clunkiness and slop. They really feel like farm equipment if you're used to a Honda.

When you're talking about just learning the basics like setting off from a stop, torque makes a big difference. Rev happy cars like the RX8 require higher engine speeds to engage the clutch, it can be tough for a beginner to strike the right balance of revving the engine enough to keep it from lugging, but not so much so that it doesn't roast the friction disc.

Cars that are more focused on commuting than driving can have very easy clutches. Cars like the TC have drivetrain bushings that are designed to isolate you and absorb the impact of shifting without properly matched revs. While this can be nice for a beginner learning to commute from red light to red light, these setups don't reward smooth driving and they're not satisfying to drive hard.

All that said, basically any car you're thinking of will probably be fine to learn on. Even modern mustangs have light and forgiving clutches. I think a better strategy would be to find a car you really like, and then find out if it has a particularly foreboding manual to learn on.
 

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For the most part, any modern car is going to be fairly beginner friendly. Probably the worst modern drivetrains come out of Subaru. They have a lot of clunkiness and slop. They really feel like farm equipment if you're used to a Honda.

When you're talking about just learning the basics like setting off from a stop, torque makes a big difference. Rev happy cars like the RX8 require higher engine speeds to engage the clutch, it can be tough for a beginner to strike the right balance of revving the engine enough to keep it from lugging, but not so much so that it doesn't roast the friction disc.
I can get LX off the line with no gas and no stalling. I don't do it often, but it's not hard. Very forgiving manual to drive. :)
 

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Honda makes easy and pleasant to drive Manuals. It's just personal preference. Resale won't be as good as an automatic would be if that means anything.
 
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