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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi Guys,

I bouht my Civic 2013 on all-season tires n January. Next day I bought a set of winter tires on rims, and changed wheels same day.
Yesterday I changed wheels back, washed my car and found milky color spots on my rims (please review the pictures attached below).

I was thinking that its some kind of paint, but then i checked youtube and found that it looks like a corrosion on diamond cut alloy wheels.
I've found some videos on youtube how this can be fixed, using sanding paper, polishing paste etc, like this one:

Is there anybody who has experience of fixing such kind of corrosion on alloy wheels?
Please advise what materials should I use?

Thanks
 

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Looks like they were scratched/hit and the clearcoat failed around that area.
Besides getting them refinished by a pro, there isn’t much you can do.
Also replicas are about $150 each.


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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Looks like they were scratched/hit and the clearcoat failed around that area.
Besides getting them refinished by a pro, there isn’t much you can do.
Also replicas are about $150 each.


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I agree that scratches and dents triggered the clearcoat failing process.
I am not a pro, but I already got 400-5000 sandpaper, 60-2000 sadpaper disks with adapter for drill, masking tape and Ultimate Compound polishing paste.
I have nothing to loose. The video I shared above shows similar issue and method how anyonw can try to fix it.
So I am gonna try to fix and do my best, I am just waiting for some warm weather in Winterpeg. Probably, going to make this work done in early May.
 

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I wouldn’t use sandpaper.
The face of the wheel is machined (unlike in the video) and you won’t be able to remove the clear coat between the ridges. Shops use sandblasting instead.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I wouldn’t use sandpaper.
The face of the wheel is machined (unlike in the video) and you won’t be able to remove the clear coat between the ridges. Shops use sandblasting instead.
I was not planning to do this job at this time, but I decided to go to underground parking lot where my car sits, took my sandpaper and tried to sand one "white" spot quickly.
It was dark there, but I just quickly tried.
Now i know that:
1. It is a clear coat (which is pretty thick) fail.
2. It is doable, not professionally, but its possible to fix. There is no question that sandblasting and professional painting is the best way to refurbish them, but it is not a cheap option, so I would try to fix by myself.
3. This process will take time, there should be no rush.
4. I should consider buying a higher quality sandpaper.
5. Should cover with automotive lacquer? I think it would not stay for a long time on polished aluminum...

Next time I will spend enough time, at day time and outdoors to have enough light. I will also get aluminum polishing paste for the next time.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
So, I've done this job today and would like to share with you guys my experience, what i have done etc.

What I used\Costs: 1. Sanding papers Norton P320, P400 and P600 ($15 CAD at Home Depot). 2. Sanding discs for drill (Kit P60-P3000, but I used just P80 and P120) ($16 CAD on Amazon). 3. Masking tape ($3 CAD on Amazon). 4. Aceton ($13CAD at Home Depot) 5. Cloth ($2 CAD at Dollarama ) 6. Acrylic lacquer (Purchased last year for a different project). Total ~ $50 CAD.

Process: 1. Wheel was washed with water and was letting to dry 2. Used masking tape (took 20-30 min) 3. Used sanding discs first on a drill. Dicsc kit was purchased on Amazon.ca. P80 and P120 were used, also sanded by hand with same grit discs 4. Used P320, P400 and P600 sanding papers 5. Cleaned with Aceton and let it completely dry 6. Applied three layers of acrylic lacquer (10 min between each), let it dry for ~ hours 7. Removed masking tape and installed refurbished wheel back on my Civic.

Comments: 1. Entire process took ~ 5 hours. 2. I would use P800+ sanding paper finally but I afraid that lacquer would not stay long on so fine polished aluminum. 3. I put 3 light layers of lacquer, should be not heavy for polished aluminum surface. 4. I have all the stuff left which is enough to refurbish 1-2 such rims, so its costs me $16 per (1) rim or less (Lacquer, Aceton, Cloth left for 2+ rims for sure). 5. Next time I will wear protective glasses. 5. OPTION: If you are Ok to polish with polishing paste (for aluminum) once a months and you want to have a super glossy ("mirror) finish, you can do not use lacquer at all (it would fall off) and contunie polishing with P800 - P2000 sanding paper and finally, with polishing paste. This should give you a different but another great result.

Summary: 1. I am tired :) but got some experience now. Next time, with next rim(s) I will be more precised and accurate. 2. I am impressed by the result. Looks cool and in a few meters you don't see the difference. 3. All previous clearcoat failure and 'milky' spots are gone :) 4. In fact, it is doable buy yourself at home.

I would be happy if somebody finds this information useful and helpful for fixing this type of issue.

Please find some pictures (w/comments) below:
 

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