9th Gen Civic Forum banner

1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This was my first actual install, the LX and HF (mine) have a windshield wiper controller with only one intermittent speed setting. EX and above have what is called a Variable Intermittent Wiper, which allows you to set intermittent wiper timing from around 6 to around 20 seconds. It's a minor "luxury" option, but it's cheap and it's a good project to familiarize yourself with installing new features if you're thinking about something more extensive.

I've tried to make this as detailed a walkthrough as possible so that a first-time modder can feel confident about being able to do this successfully. If you're concerned you might not be able to do this, skip to step 12 and try to find, release, and work with connector T behind the under-dash fuse/relay box. That's the hardest part to get to and work with in this whole project.

Parts needed:
35256-TR0-K11 Wiper Switch Assembly (Honda OEM part - available through dealerships or on-line parts stores, just Google the part number)
16-02-0096 Molex crimp terminal (minimum 2, but they're cheap, get extras - you'll need spares and you can use them on other projects). Available here:
Mouser Electronics, Inc.
(This isn't the exact correct terminal, but I couldn't find the correct one in lots of less than 10,000. This terminal is very close and worked fine for me)
A few feet of 24 AWG wire (you can use other wire gauges, but I'd recommend 24)
A few zip ties
A length of 1/4 inch split loom tubing to match your wire (optional but recommended for a professional-looking install and to protect your wire)
Amazon.com: American Terminal SL250-100 1/4-Inch Split Loom Tubing, 100 feet: Car Electronics

Estimated parts cost:
Less than $35 plus shipping

Tools needed:
Small slotted screwdriver
Medium Philips Screwdriver
Wire stripper
Crimp tool (optional, but this makes crimping the terminals easier)

Install process:
1) Prepare a length of wire by stripping no more than 1/4 inch from one end. The crimp terminal has two crimping points, one at the rear that's a bit larger, this is designed to grab the section of the wire that still has insulation. The second one is designed to crimp over the stripped wire. Lay the stripped end in and crimp both locations as appropriate. If you're not using a crimping tool, you'll have to crush-crimp each crimp point several times, turning 90 degrees each time, to secure the wire. Give a slight tug to the crimp terminal when done, it should be solidly attached.
2) Take off the steering column top cover. Turn the steering wheel hard to the right. In the upper right corner of the steering column where the steering wheel normally hides it, you'll see a spot where you can gently slip the slotted screwdriver in to release a plastic tab. Push in then up. The cover should begin to release and you should be able to finish removing it by hand with little difficulty.
3) With the steering wheel still hard to the right, use the Philips screwdriver to remove the exposed screw that is visible with the cover removed.
4) Reach behind the wiper switch assembly. You'll find a white plug that connects wires to the wiper switch. To pull out the plug you'll need to find and depress a small catch. Press this down and pull out with steady pressure, wiggle it back and forth to help release it if necessary.
5) Look at the plug, at the rear you'll see where a locking mechanism mates with angled locking points. Use the small slotted screwdriver to gently release each side and push up. The lock should move up at an angle of about 30-40 degrees from the top of the plug. This will allow you to insert the crimp terminal in it's slow easily.
6) Insert the crimp terminal in terminal slot 10. The plug has two rows of 5 wires. Slot 10 will be the vacant slot on a row where 4 other wires are already installed. Gently push it all the way in and when done push the locking mechanism back down.
7) Remove the old wiper switch by depressing two locking tabs, on on the top and one on the bottom, and pulling it to the side.
8) Install the new wiper switch by reversing this process, pushing it in until the locking tabs snap, installing the screw, and plugging in the wire connector.
9) (Optional) remove the lower dash cover for easier access. Start at the left and simply pull with strong, steady pressure. Once the first plastic catch snaps and releases, the rest will be easier to pull out. Be careful you don't pull anything so hard you damage the cover. Unplug the VSA switch and set the cover aside.
10) Run the wire carefully to the rear of the under-dash fuse/relay panel, plan a path to secure the wire when done. Be careful not to choose a path that will interfere with the throttle, brakes, or steering mechanisms.
11) Trim your excess wire, leave a bit of working slack, and strip no more than 1/4 inch from this end of the wire. Crimp another terminal on this end of the wire just like on the other end.
12) Now comes the hardest part. You'll need to reach behind the under-dash fuse/relay box and find connector T, it will be toward the top of the unit. This is a green 24-pin version of the same type of connector that was on the back of the switch assembly. It will similarly have a tab you have to push to release and will have a locking mechanism you will also need to release. You won't have a lot of room to work here and the cable will have very little slack. You may have to contort yourself, use a flashlight, and hopefully not have fingers that are too large to easily work in the space behind the fuse box. If you're concerned about your ability to perform this install, this might actually be a better place to start.
13) You'll need to insert the terminal in slot 6 of this connector. There will be a row with 5 wires next to one another, the last one black, and the rest of the row will be empty. Carefully insert the terminal all the way into slot 6, next to the black wire. Press the locking mechanism back down to secure the crimp terminal and wire. Reinsert the connector back in its slot behind the under-dash fuse box.
14) Tidy up your wire, use the optional split loom tubing to protect it and use zip ties to secure it out of the way so your feet won't catch it when driving.
15) Test by turning the ignition to position II, trigger the window washing fluid sprayer so your windshield isn't dry, then move the wiper to Int and turn the intermittent time controller to the minimum. Count the seconds, turn it to the maximum and count the seconds. You should have a range of around 6-20 seconds, if the wire is not connected properly there will be no difference in timing between minimum and maximum. If it doesn't work, you'll need to check your newly installed wire carefully end-to-end to ensure the crimping is secure, the terminal is fully inserted, and it is inserted in the correct slots.
16) Replace your dash cover and upper steering column cover and go over everything carefully to ensure you haven't forgotten to return anything to its original location.

If you have problems or questions, post them on this thread. I'll try to get some pictures added as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Updated with photos

Photo of the tab for step 2:

IMAG0589.jpg

Step 3, Philips screw:
IMAG0590.jpg
Step 4, White plug
IMAG0376.jpg IMAG0377.jpg
Step 5, Connector locking mechanism in unlocked position
IMAG0472.jpg
Step 12, The best photo I could get of the connector T, sorry it's so blurry
IMAG0593.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If you run into any problems or have additional questions, just post them here. I'd like to see someone else go through it to make sure I haven't missed anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Also note I was wrong about the intermittent timing. It may have been because I did my initial testing only on battery. The day after I installed it I actually got to use it in a light misting rain on the way to work. With the engine running the intermittent wiper timing was from 0 seconds at minimum to 16 seconds at the maximum delay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
I have done this mod yesterday. It gives a very nice touch to my LX, but it is a really really P.I.A. to get access to the connector behind the fuse box.

Thanks Baronvonsmash.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,139 Posts
It's embarrassing Honda does not have this on all cars.


Sent from my iPhone using AutoGuide.com App
 
  • Like
Reactions: magillaonfire

·
Truck? What truck?!
Joined
·
27,588 Posts
That's for sure. How much extra cost can this be installed at the factory? Pennies?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
How did you manage to get at the Connector 'T' ???

Thanks Baronvonsmash for the great info,

I've managed to find and disconnect the Connector 'T' (I think), but how were you able to pry the connector apart to insert the terminal crimp? I can get one hand onto it, and have tried using a long-handled screwdriver - maybe the slot is a bit too big to pry the connector open. I'm afaid it'll be even tougher though to insert the terminal crimp, using one hand and all.

I thought if I could loosen the fuse box I might be able to get a better handle on the connector; I removed two 10mm bolts securing the box, but there's still something else holding it in place and I've been unable to figure out just what it is.

Any tips on how you accomplished this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Success!

So, after much patience and perseverence, I was able to pry open the connector 't' and insert the crimp terminal into the slot. For anyone else wanting to try this one, I would definitely start with Step 12 - and don't try to rush it. There's barely room for one hand behind the fusebox, so I was able to use a long-handled flat screwdriver (~15" long) both to open the connector and to hold it while I inserted the crimp terminal. The rest is a piece of cake. Thanks again to baronvonsmash for a very useful upgrade that Honda should've put there in the first place.
(I imagine it actually costs them more to manufacture two different switches and the associated wiring harnesses).

I found a photo of the fusebox showing the location of the connector 't':
Fusebox (bk).jpg

I thought it might help to clarify which connector to look for, as there are several green connectors on the backside of the fusebox.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
I took a chance and ordered the variable switch for my 2014 LX sedan, using the switch from the EX.


switch assy., wiper
Part# : 35256-TV0-S61
Unit price: $21.42 - Quantity: 1




It was cheap enough to take a shot at assuming that although the part number for the switch is different than that of the DIY, the wiring is the same. We'll soon find out for better or worse. lol. Something has to give, as the fixed interval wipers drive me insane. I think every car I've owned in the last decade has had variable wipers, even my POS 2001 Focus.


I'll keep the thread updated if the process works the same on the 2014.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I did this mod yesterday to my 2012 civic lx, so happy I found this DIY because the first time I drove the car in the rain I was like awww one speed??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
I did this mod today on my 2014 LX sedan and can confirm it works. Thank you for the DIY. Just posting this if anyone with a '14 is curious.

The part # for the correct variable switch for the 2014 is in my post above.

The pins you use are the same on '14. Figured they would be as the car hasn't changed that much other than cosmetically.

My car is a stick shift. This makes the install tougher. The best term I can think of to describe the job rhymes with "snore" but starts with "wh" instead of "sn". You have the clutch pedal and cruise safety switch on the clutch pedal bracket. This makes it real hard to get your hands up behind the fuse box. With an automatic, I think you'd have a lot more room where the clutch pedal would be, and it would make a big access difference for the better.

I had to disconnect the two fuse box mounting bolts and move it forward to get back there. Some long, skinny flat tip screwdrivers helped, too. All in all, a total PITA to access that green plug, undo the locking bail, and get the molex in there.

Far easier on the top end.

Like others have mentioned, I recommend starting at the fuse box end. At this point, you'll decide whether you can do the job or not, or whether it is too frustrating. Make or break. Not worth doing the steering wheel end if you are going to get shot down by the fuse box. I was just about at my wits end on the box side. I gave serious thought to saying screw it. lol. But it worked out after a lot of trying.

Thanks again for the procedure. Top notch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I ask my colleagues: how to access the T connector with little space to insert the pin into the right slot. Would you like to help me. I have already installed the switch on the steering wheel, insert the pin in the connector but still did not get full access to the fuse box. How did they do? How did?
Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I ask my colleagues: how to access the T connector with little space to insert the pin into the right slot. Would you like to help me. I have already installed the switch on the steering wheel, insert the pin in the connector but still did not get full access to the fuse box. How did they do? How did?
Thank you.
I put my streamlight flashlight up on a bracket and stuffed my left hand up there, with the right pulled the connector back and twisted it sideways, stuffed my left hand up , grab connector, use right with a 90' pick to loosen the lock, push in pin. lock, done. Just be patient, I work in a repair shop so I'm used to miserable no room to work or see jobs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
After JUST finishing this on my wifes 2014 LX, a few comments. Remove the negative cabe of the battery just to be safe. I did find that unbolting the fuse/relay box give you about another inch of much needed room to get your hand up to the top back of the box (as long as you have small hands like me) to unclip the plug, If not, it looks like you might be able to get the bale from the top, as I could see it with an inspection mirror up there, with some sort of tool or rod. There is a large bundle of wires that you can also unclip from the steering wheel support. Be prepaired to feel like you are doing brain surgery in a culvert once you have the plug free, but it is do-able with good glasses. I found the wire on the top plug did not fully insert in the plug and I used a small sharp point to get it fully in. I went back and did the same thing on the lower plug just to be sure it was inserted all the way. I did manage to snap-off the brake light switch, so you might want to check how it is positioned and then remove it with a counter-clockwise twist and then pull it out and unplug it. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
I'm also surprised this isn't a standard feature on all new Honda vehicles, I thought it was since it's standard in my Si :eusa_dance:
 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Top