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Hello everyone,

I’ve got a 2014 Civic with the CVT transmission. I’d like to find out the proper way to check the Fluid in the CVT. The owner’s manual says take it to a dealer once a month, I don’t really consider this an option. Does anyone know what the method the mechanics at the dealer are using? I didn’t see an answer in searching, but my search-foo is weak. My apologies if I missed it.

Thanks, Ra_
 

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If you want to see the illustrations for the below procedure you will have to subscribe to Honda Service Express.
https://techinfo.honda.com/rjanisis/logon.asp?AHM=y&logout=Y&ValidUser=

Transmission Fluid (HCF-2) Level Check

NOTE: Keep all foreign particles out of the transmission.

1. Vehicle Lift
1. Raise the vehicle on a lift, and make sure it is securely supported.

2. Engine Undercover
1. Remove the engine undercover (A).

NOTE:
Keep all foreign particles out of the transmission.
Check the transmission fluid after the shift lever operation without spending too much time.

1. CVT Fluid Level - Check
NOTE: Check the transmission fluid after the shift lever operation without spending too much time.
1. Start the engine, and warm it up to normal operating temperature (the radiator fan comes on twice).

2. While pressing the brake pedal firmly, shift in turn the shift lever to PRNDSDNRP (with paddle shifters)/ PRNDSLSDNRP (without paddle shifters) , and wait for at least 3 seconds to each position.

3. Turn the engine off.

4. Remove the filler plug (A) and the sealing washer (B).
NOTE: Be careful not to burn yourself by the hot part.

5. Make sure the transmission fluid is at the proper level (A).

6. If the fluid level is below the proper level, check for fluid leaks at the transmission and the fluid lines. If a problem is found, fix it before filling the transmission with transmission fluid.

7. If necessary, add the transmission with the recommended fluid into the filler plug hole (B) until transmission fluid overflows. Always use Honda HCF-2 Continuously Variable Transmission Fluid.

8. Reinstall the filler plug with a new sealing washer.

2. Engine Undercover
1. Install the engine undercover (A).
 

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I just went through all the questions being asked here about how much fluid a change on the 2014-2017 Honda Civic CVT requires and how do you check the fluid level? There is no fluid level dipstick on the 2nd generation CVT transmissions, and checking the fluid is a bit of work. What must be done is to find the fluid check bolt on the front of the transmission down from where the fluid fill opening is, where the rubber stopper-like fill cap is. When you remove this large bolt with washer, you will detect a small trickle of the fluid and this indicates that the transmission is full. If it does not trickle a little, add a small amount of fresh HCF-2 fluid until it does and then put the bolt back on, tightening to about the same torque used to tighten the drain plug under the car. The crush washer used on this bolt can be replaced with a new one if you have one, but as has been the case for years, most of the time unless a lot of torque was used a washer can suffice for several uses if it is flipped over. However, when in doubt if it looks weird or warped, replace it with a new one. Always check for leaks after tightening!


Unless a leak is detected or some abnormality in the way the car drives or the transmission is not the usual smoothness in operation, no fluid should be required. In such cases the dealer or other competent service must be consulted (Honda covers up to 5 years or 60k miles in its warranty).


The proper fluid and only CVT fluid that should be used in a recent (2013 on) Civic, Accord, CR-V or other CVT Honda vehicle is the 2nd generation HCF-2, which your dealer or a source on-line can supply. About 4 quarts covers the fluid change, which should be performed every 25k to 30k miles. If you drive in a hot and dusty environment, every 25k is best, but under normal conditions every 30,000 miles should suffice. As only about half of the fluid contained can be drained each time, it might be advisable when work has been done or if other adverse conditions have been encountered to change the fluid and then change again a thousand or 2k miles later. This effectively enables a full fluid change. There is no reported fluid filter that can be changed for the CVT transmission. The photos here are from a 2014 (and should look similar for 2015-2017) Honda Civics. CVT Fluid Check Bolt.jpg HCF-2 level check Bolt copy.jpg HCF-2 Fill  Opening.jpg Honda HCF-2 label front.jpg
 

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I am curious of the correct procedure on the 2014 Civic Hybrid CVT.

The CVT does have a dipstick, however the dipstick tube is not vertical. It is tilted towards the rear on the vehicle.

One side of the dipstick says "cold" and the other side says "hot".

Here's the catch, if you insert the stick into the tube with the hot side towards rear of the car you get vastly different reading then if you insert dipstick with hot side towards front of car.

Example - say vehicle is warmed up/hot. You insert dipstick with hot on dipstick towards rear of car - fluid shows full. Now immediately reverse - insert dipstick with cold towards rear of car. Now when you read the hot side of dipstick it either shows fluid is just barley touching the stick.

I think this is due to the dipstick tube being slanted towards rear of car. The side of the dipstick tilted to rear will contact the fluid first, before other side of the dipstick. Maybe there is some other reason?

Bottom line, does anyone know the correct procedure to get an accurate reading of the CVT fluid on 2014 Civic hybrid?

Thanks in advance.
 

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I am curious of the correct procedure on the 2014 Civic Hybrid CVT.

The CVT does have a dipstick, however the dipstick tube is not vertical. It is tilted towards the rear on the vehicle.

One side of the dipstick says "cold" and the other side says "hot".

Here's the catch, if you insert the stick into the tube with the hot side towards rear of the car you get vastly different reading then if you insert dipstick with hot side towards front of car.

Example - say vehicle is warmed up/hot. You insert dipstick with hot on dipstick towards rear of car - fluid shows full. Now immediately reverse - insert dipstick with cold towards rear of car. Now when you read the hot side of dipstick it either shows fluid is just barley touching the stick.

I think this is due to the dipstick tube being slanted towards rear of car. The side of the dipstick tilted to rear will contact the fluid first, before other side of the dipstick. Maybe there is some other reason?

Bottom line, does anyone know the correct procedure to get an accurate reading of the CVT fluid on 2014 Civic hybrid?

Thanks in advance.
Never checked one myself.
But the service data found on Honda Service Express says:
Insert the dipstick with the dot on the handle facing to the left of the vehicle.

If you want to see the illustrations:
http://techinfo.honda.com
 

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Ok, thanks.

If it is the dot I'm thinking of it is on a yellow piece of plastic that sits on top of the dipstick cap.

Trouble is - it spins 360 degrees.
 

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So in conclusion, if you don't see drips on the floor.
It's safe to assume the CVT fluid is at the proper level.
This is an old post but needs a clarification. You cannot assume proper level because you don't see drips. It could be either right on or under filled.
 

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Great info here...although I've got 52,000 miles on my 2014 Honda Civic and the Maintenance Minder just now told me it's time to change the CVT fluid. Where did you come up with changing it between 25k and 30k miles? Thanks
 

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Great info here...although I've got 52,000 miles on my 2014 Honda Civic and the Maintenance Minder just now told me it's time to change the CVT fluid. Where did you come up with changing it between 25k and 30k miles? Thanks
I believe it the 25-30k interval is in the owners manual.
 

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This is what it says in the service data found on Service Express for 2014 Civic
Under Sub Menu item #3.

Note: long as it's done right changing fluids early or more often does no harm other than to your wallet.

That said, and of my experiences with Honda CVT transmissions, I would change the CVT fluid every 25K miles minimum...
And if given a choice, I would not choose a CVT trans made by any manufacturer.

Sub Item 3.

Replace manual transmission fluid
Use Honda MTF.
Capacity
- 5M/T: 1.4 L (1.5 US qt)
- 6M/T: 1.9 L (2.0 US qt)


Replace automatic transmission fluid
Use Honda ATF DW-1.
Capacity: 2.4 L (2.5 US qt)

Replace transmission fluid (HCF-2) CVT Transmission
NOTE: Using the wrong type of fluid will damage the transmission
Use Honda HCF-2.
Capacity: 3.4 L (3.6 US qt)
Driving in mountainous areas at very low vehicle speeds or trailer towing results in higher transmission temperatures. This requires transmission fluid changes more frequently than recommended by the Maintenance Minder. If the vehicle is regularly driven in under these conditions, have the transmission fluid changed every 25,000 miles (40,000 km).
 

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I have a 2015 civic with CVT. I drained the transmission and removed the overflow/level plug. I then added new fluid until it started to dribble out of the overflow. I replaced the overflow plug, started and shifted into all gears for a few seconds. Just to make shure, I shifted through the gears a second time. I then removed the overflow plug and added the rest of the 4th quart of fluid. I expected to see fluid dribbling from the overflow, but that did not happen even before the 4th quart was empty. The dealer sold me 4 quarts and it looks like the capacity is 3.6 quarts.
What went wrong? How do I know if it is over filled? Should I drive it a few miles and then raise the car again and check the overflow?

Thanks.
 

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I have a 2015 civic with CVT. I drained the transmission and removed the overflow/level plug. I then added new fluid until it started to dribble out of the overflow. I replaced the overflow plug, started and shifted into all gears for a few seconds. Just to make shure, I shifted through the gears a second time. I then removed the overflow plug and added the rest of the 4th quart of fluid. I expected to see fluid dribbling from the overflow, but that did not happen even before the 4th quart was empty. The dealer sold me 4 quarts and it looks like the capacity is 3.6 quarts.
What went wrong? How do I know if it is over filled? Should I drive it a few miles and then raise the car again and check the overflow?

Thanks.
The level check should be done with the vehicle on level with the ground.
Did you "raise" just the front of the vehicle? The transmission could be over full now.
 

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I did have the car level with jack stands, so that was not the problem. I am thinking it might be because is was not at operating temperature. I drove the car a few miles and will now check the overflow at operating temp. I expect to get fluid from the overflow.

Thanks
 

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Well, I jacked the car up and leveled with jack stands, it was at operating temperature, and removed the overflow bolt. There was no fluid that came out. I don't believe it is under filled since I put in 4 quarts. It seems to drive and shift fine. I don't know that there is anything else I can do.
 

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Well, I jacked the car up and leveled with jack stands, it was at operating temperature, and removed the overflow bolt. There was no fluid that came out. I don't believe it is under filled since I put in 4 quarts. It seems to drive and shift fine. I don't know that there is anything else I can do.
Add fluid until it dribbles out of the level hole.

Capture.JPG
 
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