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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Not responsible if you attempt this and the info here if something happens... blah blah blah... we all know that public safety message. :)

Ok, Just installed my some Koni's this weekend. This is my first attempt to do a DIY with pics so hopefully its helpful.

- It seems like a task to cut the struts and install but actually was quite simple.
- Also did the rears but lost patience with pictures. I will add an important note on the rears that my trial and error may help with.

Tools used
-Sockets, extensions, wrenches. Primarily 12, 14, 19.
- Torque and impact wrench if you got one.
- Pipe Cutter (for the cleanest cut)
- Jack and Jack stands unless your awesome enough to have a lift.
- Nail Polish (thats right, works great but may piss off your wife)
- Spring compressor (can be rented at autozone, you pay for them and when you return them get a refund) that is their rental program.
IMG_2952.jpg

After Jacking up the car and taking off the wheel, taking off the front strut starts with removing the 12mm brake line bracket, two 19mm brake disk arm bolts, and 14mm socket, and detaching the clips reference in the picture. I placed a jack under the brake disc, to keep that from falling straight down.
diy 1.jpg

Now to get to the top end of the strut. First remove the front strut bolt access cover and then remove the 3 bolts and dust cover. I believe the 3 bolts are 14mm but dont recall.
diy 2.jpg

After removing those items, the strut should be able to be removed from the car and the fun stuff begins.
IMG_2964.jpg

When removing the spring from the strut, its important to mark the original locations of all parts being taken apart. *Warning- I use my wifes nail polish. Its hardens and doesnt wipe off but do this at your own risk. Sleeping on the couch sucks so an alternate can be used. :)
IMG_2970.jpg

Use the spring compressors to compress the springs to be able to take off the top hat section of the strut. Caution should be taken when doing this step as they are under load and taking a spring to the face is never a good things. The use of a impact wrench makes this easy. Ive done it without when putting the lowering springs in and its wrenching for days.
IMG_2978.jpg

To remove the top bolt, you will need an allen wrench and for me a pair or jenky pliers. I had nothing else that would accommodate the allen wrench. Once the bolt is removed, the springs can be removed.
IMG_2979.jpg IMG_2980.jpg

The Konis drop into your stock struts and use them as a housing. This requires the strut to be cut. Instructions are included but you will have to measure the mark on the koni shock and mark that measurement on your stock strut.
diy 3.jpg IMG_2986.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Mark the bottom of the strut tower at center to drill a hole. I believe it was a half in bit. This is how the shock will be held into the strut. A bolt gets threaded in through the bottom. This is the easiest way to let the pressure out of the stock setup. Note that the gas and oil is pressurized so safety goggles are a good idea.
IMG_2989.jpg

Now comes to cutting the mark made earlier. I used a pipe cutter. It's a super clean cut. A hack saw can also be used. Just file down the edge briefly and you're good to go. Once its cut, pull the internals and drain the remaining fluild. I used a rag and a screw driver to wipe it out.
IMG_2987.jpg IMG_2988.jpg

At this point I was running out of time so pictures stopped but its extremely straight forward from here.

-drop the koni shock into the strut
-tighten the provided screw in through the bottom whole you did with the lock washer.
-place the springs back on and top hat section.
-reverse the process to put it back on.
-once all is back on -GET AN ALIGNMENT!


**** For the rears, it is very straight forward and sorry I didnt have time for pics. The one process that got me was how to get the old bumpstop and dust guard off. When you take off the rear stock shock you will see an insert just under the threads. I had to drill out the pinched section with is clearly visible and this will all the insert to slide off.



 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ive driven around and adjusted here and there. I can tell a noticeable difference on ride stiffness and bumps but honeslty wont be able to really tell until my next autocross event at the end of this month. Ill update after that. :) Feels good though right now.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I was running H&R springs but now running ground control coilovers. Hit up Chris at RedShift in my signature. He set menu on with everything I needed and has to best customer service ever!! I'll he doing a write up on the coilovers and Chris!
 

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Figured I'd just add in some info to this.

Here is the link for Redshift's guide. Was helpful to use along with this and includes a lot of good tips.

Some products to make it easier:

- Get a step drill bit for drilling the hole in the bottom of the strut and for drilling out the top of the rear dust cover. It makes things much easier.
- Superior makes a nice (made in the USA) pipe cutter for just over $20 bucks (link). You can find it at many Home Improvement stores.
- If you want to get the torque right for the bottom screw, make sure you have an allen socket (I can't remember the size unfortunately).
- I'd also recommend a good swivel-head deburring tool (such as this) if you don't have one. Makes cleaning up your cuts much easier (especially the strut housings, as it can be a pain to get the strut insert in if you don't clean it up really well).

Some tips:

- Even with springs that sit higher (Eibach Pro-Kit), you do not need spring compressors to take off or put on the top hat of the front strut. Huge time saver.
- Careful when drilling that bottom hole in the front struts! If you stop as soon as you start seeing the liquid coming out it will probably release in a fine spray that can get everywhere! Try to keep drilling until it has more of an opening to escape.
 
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