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Discussion Starter #1
Plastidip is a well known product around here. But I just came across a product called Flexidip by Rustoleum. I have never seen it mentioned here at 9th gen.

It seems to be cheaper by the can, goes on thinner, and by differing accounts, gives a smoother finish than Plastidip. Of course, the variables of coat thickness, number of coats, and distance sprayed from surface come into play, which is why so many of the discussions in the link below offer very few definite conclusions.

Here is a link to various sites that have been discussing Flexidip:

https://www.google.com/search?q=flexidip+plastidip&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

You can watch the youtube videos and let me know how they went. Like so many of these videos, I'd rather poke my eyes and ears out than have to sit through them.

And finally, has anyone here used Rustoleum Flexidip? What have been your experiences?
 

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I've used both Plastidip and Flexidip. The Flexidip goes on real light (just like most people have stated) and requires multiple coats for the desired likeness. I like the spray nozzle that is used compared to the standard offered on the plastidip cans. It gives you more adjustability in your sprays. The Flexidip I used (black) had more of a smooth semigloss finish as compared to the rough Plastidip matte black finish. I used the Flexidip on on emblems and tried it on wheels. I found that the product did not hold up as well as the Plastidip in regular washes and wear from driving (keep in mind that I thoroughly prepped and cleaned the wheels and emblems prior to applying the dips).

When comparing these two products I'd stick with Plastidip due to its durability factor. But IMO when looking for similar products, I'd strongly suggest using Autodip (no I am not a sponsor or fanboy of this product... it just gives better results).

Hope that helps.
 

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Truck? What truck?!
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Discussion Starter #3
zoomer, thanks for that succinct review. But now there is a third product thrown into the equation. Can you expand a little on Autodip?
 

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zoomer, thanks for that succinct review. But now there is a third product thrown into the equation. Can you expand a little on Autodip?
Autodip is by far the closest you can go without having to actually paint the part/product. It's made with a type of polymer vinyl similar to what is found in vinyl use in wrapping and overlays. It goes on nice and smooth and is easy to work with. Like with all products of this nature, it requires proper cleaning and prepping prior to use. The vinyl properties and uv inhibitors found in this product make it durable and fade resistant. I've used the color black on wheels that were scuffed up due to autoX, and the Autodip filled in the scuffs and scratches perfectly. The Autodip survived two years and winters without any peeling/bubbling. The only drawback I have is its price. It's finish it that of a glossy freshly painted surface (at least the black was).
The nozzle is similar to the Flexidip's as in adjust ability.
 

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I think i need some Autodip to spray my rear window spoiler, I would like it to be a semi gloss black instead of the original smoke tint color it is, great info on the products.
 

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Truck? What truck?!
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27,140 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Autodip is by far the closest you can go without having to actually paint the part/product. It's made with a type of polymer vinyl similar to what is found in vinyl use in wrapping and overlays. It goes on nice and smooth and is easy to work with. Like with all products of this nature, it requires proper cleaning and prepping prior to use. The vinyl properties and uv inhibitors found in this product make it durable and fade resistant. I've used the color black on wheels that were scuffed up due to autoX, and the Autodip filled in the scuffs and scratches perfectly. The Autodip survived two years and winters without any peeling/bubbling. The only drawback I have is its price. It's finish it that of a glossy freshly painted surface (at least the black was).
The nozzle is similar to the Flexidip's as in adjust ability.
Thank you. I will have to look further into this.

What is the 'removability' factor?
 

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That ugly paint job will cost you thousands in repairs. Hi! Phil Swift here! Everyone knows Flex Seal is the easy way to coat, seal, and protect!!!
 
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